1968 by Richard Vinen
Radical Protest and Its Enemies

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

Though the book is not for readers unfamiliar with the historical terrain, Vinen provides a well-written, deeply considered work on a year that seems increasingly immediate in both its impact and implications.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

A major new history of one of the seminal years in the postwar world, when rebellion and disaffection broke out on an extraordinary scale.

The year 1968 saw an extraordinary range of protests across much of the western world. Some of these were genuinely revolutionary—around ten million French workers went on strike and the whole state teetered on the brink of collapse. Others were more easily contained, but had profound longer-term implications—terrorist groups, feminist collectives, gay rights activists could all trace important roots to 1968.

1968 is a striking and original attempt half a century later to show how these events, which in some ways still seem so current, stemmed from histories and societies which are in practice now extraordinarily remote from our own time. 1968 pursues the story into the 1970s to show both the ever more violent forms of radicalization that stemmed from 1968 and the brutal reaction that brought the era to an end.

 

About Richard Vinen

See more books from this Author
Richard Vinen is the author of the highly-praised A History in Fragments: Europe in the Twentieth Century, The Unfree French: Life under the Occupation (published by Penguin) and Thatcher's Britain. He is Professor of History at King's College, London.
 
Published July 3, 2018 by Harper. 448 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for 1968
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Above average
on Apr 30 2018

Though the book is not for readers unfamiliar with the historical terrain, Vinen provides a well-written, deeply considered work on a year that seems increasingly immediate in both its impact and implications.

Read Full Review of 1968: Radical Protest and Its... | See more reviews from Kirkus
×