4 by Pelevin by Victor Pelevin

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Synopsis

Fictional Novel, Literary Fiction
 

About Victor Pelevin

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He was born in Moscow. Andrew Bromfield is a founding editor of the Russian literature journal GLAS, and has translated into English works from authors as diverse as Tolstoy, Michael Bulgakov, and, more recently, Sergei Lukyanenko, whose NIGHT WATCH series has sold more than three million copies worldwide.
 
Published September 1, 2001 by New Directions Publishing Corporation. 101 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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While hiding out, Hu-li and Alexander argue about religion, death, truth and the like until they both claim to be the “super-werewolf.” This argument—and Hu-li's disclosure of her true age—rupture the bliss.

Jul 07 2008 | Read Full Review of 4 by Pelevin

Publishers Weekly

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In a starred review PW wrote that this Russian novella ""fuses pungent, visceral imagery reminiscent of Maxim Gorky with an absurdist comic outlook."" (May)

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A rising star in the Russian literary firmament (see The Yellow Arrow, below), Pelevin, winner of the 1993 Russian Booker Prize for short stories, has written a parody of life under Communism refracted through the prism of the Soviet space program.

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Publishers Weekly

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Young, popular and considered very hip, Little Russian Booker Prize winner Pelevin has already made a name for himself among the crop of writers who have grown out of post-Soviet Russia.

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The two settings provide Pelevin, who won Russia's ""Little Booker"" prize for his collection The Blue Lantern, with plenty of room to obsess about political changes and social realities in Russia (at one point, Maria announces, ""That's always the way with Russia...

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From time to time, people escape the train's stifling communal space by climbing out onto the roof, where they communicate in wordless gestures.

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(One key skill described is how to get paid before the client is murdered.) Soon he's spending all his time creating Russian funhouse-mirror versions of American ads and reading vapid American texts extolling the virtues of "comparative positioning."

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Publishers Weekly

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Pelevin pulls no punches with the metaphor woven into "Vera Pavlovna's Ninth Dream," in which a public toilet attendant finds her world transformed into a giddy commercial paradise, only to have a fountain of sewage plunge that world into a kind of septic Tartarus.

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