79 Park Avenue by Harold Robbins

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See Reader Rating

Synopsis

From the author of The New York Times #1 best-selling novel The Carpetbaggers comes a story of a tragic love triangle between Marja Fluudjincki (aka Maryann Flood), an ambitious and sensual young woman from the slums who is forced into prostitution, but reinvents herself as an elegant Park Avenue madam; Mike Keyes, a hardworking, honest man who works his way up to Assistant District Attorney and is the only man Marja ever loved; and Ross Drego, who introduces her to money and the gambler’s world of Joker Martin, and is willing to pay any price for her. And does.

79 Park Avenue starts on the seedy streets of inner NYC and ends on luxurious Park Avenue. Over time, Marja claws her way from street urchin to stripper—ultimately becoming the madam of a Mob-owned pleasure empire. Marja—now known as Maryann—provides access to the city’s most exciting and sensual “escorts.” But when Maryann runs afoul of the law, endangering her empire and angering the Mob, she must face an ambitious prosecutor who stands to benefit by bringing down the call girl ring. However, unbeknownst to the indefatigable ADA Mike Keyes, fate has dealt him a devastating blow. The madam he’s been chasing, Maryann Flood, is none other than the love of his life who has repeatedly broken his heart, Marja Fluudjincki.

Does he set aside his personal feelings for the sake of justice, or fall under Maryann’s seductive spell, betraying his life’s work? Knowing that Maryann is unafraid to use seduction to get what she wants, will Mike fall prey to her charm and violate his solid sense of justice?

Harold Robbins presents a vision of post-WWII New York that is as common now in shows like Revenge as it was then—a stark reminder that corruption, greed, and vengeance are timeless. Spending 12 weeks on The New York Times best sellers list, this novel tells a sizzling story of sexuality, power, and lust that inspired the 1977 Golden Globe®-winning miniseries of the same name.

About the Author
Harold Robbins (1916–1997) is one of the best-selling American fiction writers of all time, ranking 5th on the World’s Best-Selling Fiction Author List just behind William Shakespeare and Agatha Christie. He wrote over 25 best-selling novels, sold more than 750 million copies in 42 languages and spent over 300 weeks combined on The New York Times best sellers list. His books were adapted into 13 commercially successful films and also television series that garnered numerous Oscar®, Golden Globe® and Primetime Emmy® nominations starring Steve McQueen, Elvis Presley, Laurence Olivier, Bette Davis, Robert Duvall, Tommy Lee Jones and more.

The self-proclaimed “world’s best writer in plain English,” Robbins wrote novels that resonated with audiences due to their graphic depictions of sex, violence, power and drugs, and the multilayered complexities of his characters, as evidenced by his best-selling novels Never Love a Stranger, The Carpetbaggers, Where Love Has Gone, and The Adventurers. He once said in an interview: “People make their own choices every day about what they are willing to do. We don’t have the right to judge them or label them. At least walk in their shoes before you do.”

Robbins’ personal life was as fascinating to the public as his novels. An enthusiastic participant in the social and sexual revolution of the 1960s, Robbins cultivated a “playboy” image and maintained friendships with stars including Frank Sinatra, Clint Eastwood, Tony Bennett, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dino De Laurentiis, Robert Evans, Ringo Starr, Barbara Eden, Lena Horne and Quincy Jones, and was one of the first novelists to be prominently featured in gossip magazines, earning him the title of “The World’s First Rock Star Author.”
 

About Harold Robbins

See more books from this Author
Harold Robbins was born in New York City on May 21, 1916. He later claimed to be a Jewish orphan who had been raised in a Catholic boys' home, but in reality he was raised in Brooklyn by his father and stepmother. He made his first million at the age of twenty by selling sugar for wholesale trade. By the beginning of World War II, he lost all his fortunes. He eventually moved to Hollywood and worked for Universal Pictures. His first book, Never Love a Stranger, was published in 1948. He began writing full time in 1957. He published more than 20 books during his lifetime including The Dream Merchants (1949), The Betsy (1971), The Storyteller (1982), and The Carpetbaggers (1961). His novel, A Stone for Danny Fisher (1951), was adapted into a 1958 motion picture King Creole starring Elvis Presley. He died from respiratory heart failure on October 14, 1997 at the age of 81. Since his death, several new books have been published, written by ghostwriters and based on his notes and unfinished stories.
 
Published May 15, 2014 by RosettaBooks. 320 pages
Genres: Action & Adventure, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Romance, Biographies & Memoirs, Comics & Graphic Novels, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Humor & Entertainment, Cooking, Crime, History, Travel. Fiction

Reader Rating for 79 Park Avenue
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 37 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×