97 Orchard by Jane Ziegelman
An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement

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Synopsis

“Social history is, most elementally, food history. Jane Ziegelman had the great idea to zero in on one Lower East Side tenement building, and through it she has crafted a unique and aromatic narrative of New York’s immigrant culture: with bread in the oven, steam rising from pots, and the family gathering round.” — Russell Shorto, author of The Island at the Center of the World

97 Orchard is a richly detailed investigation of the lives and culinary habits—shopping, cooking, and eating—of five families of various ethnicities living at the turn of the twentieth century in one tenement on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. With 40 recipes included, 97 Orchard is perfect for fans of Rachel Ray’s Hometown Eats; anyone interested in the history of how immigrant food became American food; and “foodies” of every stripe.

 

About Jane Ziegelman

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Jane Ziegelman is the director of the Tenement Museum's culinary center and the founder and director of Kids Cook!, a multiethnic cooking program for children. Her writing on food has appeared in numerous publications, and she is the coauthor of Foie Gras: A Passion. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
Published May 14, 2010 by HarperCollins e-books. 272 pages
Genres: History, Cooking, Science & Math. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for 97 Orchard

Kirkus Reviews

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Scattered throughout are well-placed details that continually brighten the narrative, including a 1920 public-school menu, a portrait of the pushcart culture that thrived for years, the origin of schmaltz (the delectable grease from goose skin or chicken skin) and 1860s restaurant slang (“shipwre...

Mar 15 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

The New York Times

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A look at the immigrant-led transformation of modern American cuisine, and at Mark Twain’s unbridled enthusiasm for it.

Aug 06 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

The New York Times

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Ziegelman traces the history of tenement buildings in Manhattan, noting that they were the “first American residences built expressly for multiple families — in this case, working people.” By the start of the 20th century, she writes, “97 Orchard Street stood on the most densely populated square...

Jul 27 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

Christian Science Monitor

But for readers looking for relief from this bleak picture of our eating habits’ impact on land, labor, and bodies, 97 Orchard: An Edible History of Five Immigrant Families in One New York Tenement will come as a welcome change of pace.

Jul 01 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

Dallas News

Early immigrants did not leave much of a footprint, and author Jane Ziegelman relies often on supposition - the places Lucas Glockner probably went for beer and sausage, the things Mrs. Glockner probably bought and cooked.

Jul 04 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

It's posh now, Orchard Street on New York City's Lower East Side.

Jul 29 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

The Christian Century

Jane Ziegelman writes in 97 Or­chard that gefilte fish, one of many immigrant food traditions she describes, came to New York City's tenements with German-speaking Jews at the end of the 19th century.

Oct 12 2010 | Read Full Review of 97 Orchard: An Edible History...

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