Universal Harvester is a determinedly reticent, contained novel. It is shot through with a sense of lostness that its actual story only barely brushes against.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 20 2017

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The mockery, longing and disillusionment of this music are splashed all over “Shadowbahn.” More than 30 years later, “O Superman” still feels apt. The same can be said of this novel. In 2017, it reads like an answer to and sanctuary from the American Century to come.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 10 2017

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The meaning of civil war, as Mr Armitage shows, is as messy and multifaceted as the conflict it describes. His book offers an illuminating guide through the 2,000-year muddle and does a good job of filling a conspicuous void in the literature of conflict.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 09 2017

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The book is what’s called “reader-friendly”, that is, there’s lots of white space, plenty of photos and not too many long grey columns of type. Overheard remarks, curious reflections by Sacks, poetic observations keep the narrative moving along.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 06 2017

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We may never know if these sketches were drawn by Van Gogh. Fortunately, most people like a good mystery — and this one could endure for many years.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 06 2017

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Sims combines extensive scholarship with excellent writing and organizational skills to produce a work that is not only informative but eminently readable.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 03 2017

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It may seem incongruous to call a novel as violent as “Days Without End” dreamlike, but Barry’s narrator is a gentle witness to brutality: neither reluctant nor rabid, but a semi-willing instrument — which is to say, like most of those who participate in war.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 03 2017

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Kolhatkar, a staff writer for The New Yorker and a former hedge fund analyst, expertly synthesizes an enormous amount of material, including court documents and hundreds of her own interviews.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 01 2017

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This is the theme which holds the sprawling book together. Smaller and more playful ideas spangle the talk of some of the intellectuals in its pages...

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 31 2017

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This volume delves into philosophical and spiritual quandaries as the creatures struggle for context and understanding. Throw in the new layers of Atlantis folklore and the mysterious new immortals and you’ve got one of Rice’s most imaginative tales yet.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 10 2017

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...this is also an urgently political, profoundly moral book, albeit one so playful and so fantastical that the reader may hardly notice.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 23 2017

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Both are rather static: Cal the war hero and committed lawyer; Betsy the conventional devoted and energetic wife and mother, differentiated only by her early background. Nonetheless, “Home Sweet Home” is a gripping novel, always interesting historically, and not without relevance to today’s events.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 09 2017

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His hope is that readers will feel compelled to retell these stories. He doesn’t mention something else, but I can hear it in his voice, something we could all use a little more of just now, in the dark: delight.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 15 2017

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...if everyone could adopt the level of healthy statistical scepticism that Mr Levitin would like, political debate would be in much better shape. This book is an indispensable trainer.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 04 2017

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Again and again it is as if Oates cannot quite bring herself to see that however disadvantaged Dawn Dunphy has been in her youth, there is a full human being behind her eyes, behind her fists; for all the novel strives for even-handedness it cannot, finally, avoid condescension, particularly in its final pages.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jun 11 2017

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The numerous shifts are occasionally jolting, but what is gained is a compassionate, clear gaze at the chaotic landscape of life itself. In this haunting epic tale, no one story seems too minor to be briefly illuminated.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 02 2017

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What is Auster up to here? After slogging through “4 3 2 1” it’s still difficult to say. There isn’t enough ambition in the narrative message to justify the page length, and all along I thought to myself: Auster is smarter than this.

LA Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Feb 02 2017

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