Mr. Clavin effectively debunks the popular myths about Wyatt Earp and Bat Masterson and presents a vivid and enlightening portrayal of Dodge City, the quintessential Western frontier town.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 19 2017

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This book is haunting; it is smart and engaging. It was so engrossing that I read it in a day. But it’s also a deeply uneven book whose power in some moments only illuminates the absence of this force elsewhere.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 03 2017

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...Merriam-Webster’s website is a treasure trove of information on this front, and well worth a visit (for fun!). If anything, Stamper’s dangling of information just makes you want to crack open your dictionary—not exactly a bad result for a lexicographer.

AV Club

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 17 2017

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All this seems like obvious padding, but to give Finkel the benefit of the doubt, it may simply be that his affinity for his amazing hermit got the best of him. He does a remarkable job persuading one of the world’s more recalcitrant individuals to open up...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 21 2017

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...my friend Rod Dreher, whose new book, “The Benedict Option,” is already the most discussed and most important religious book of the decade.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 14 2017

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...it would sell many more copies if it were titled This Is Why You Can’t Afford To Buy A House. As it is, Rethinking The Economics Of Land And Housing is not an appealing title but this is a very appealing book.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 13 2017

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Her analytical eye may at times be blinded by her love and admiration for her subject, and yet this is also the best book so far about one of our most polarizing contemporary literary figures.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 10 2017

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Most importantly, however, Davis fails to adequately explore or appreciate how “the brain defense” came back to haunt Weinstein, as it has so many similar defendants.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 09 2017

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Mr. Hewitt discusses numerous other legislative priorities and reforms in some detail. All of it is doable, he writes. But what is essential is speed, speed, speed.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 08 2017

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There is no plot in “South and West,” or conflict, or ending. The pleasures of this short book, rather, are found in observing the South through Didion’s eyes.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 14 2017

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Even if his own Southern white do-gooder bias occasionally peeks out from behind the otherwise elegant and sophisticated prose, Tyson effectively recasts the killing of an innocent black boy, re-investigates the subsequent trial that took place...

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

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...Florence Williams’s fascinating “The Nature Fix: Why Nature Makes Us Happier, Healthier, and More Creative.” We suffer from an “epidemic dislocation from the outdoors,” Williams writes, and it’s destructive to our mental and physical health.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 02 2017

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The book falters, however, in some of its attempts to assign causality. In one chapter, Nealon attributes Paris’s escape from a late-1660s outbreak of plague to its new penchant for lemonade. That would be a marvelous story — if it were true.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 01 2017

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This book is an ode to birds and nature, as well as to the eclectic and individual private fascinations — such as birding — that make our lives unique and worthwhile.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 18 2017

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For this reader, though, the book’s pleasures come not from the 400-page, low-and-slow smolder of its central relationship, which can at times feel like nothing more than two repressions circling one another; rather, it is Selin herself.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 17 2017

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The book and the characters refuse to conform to type, and “Running,” like all good outlaw literature, takes sharp aim at the contemporary culture’s pervasive willingness to do so.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 17 2017

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What is remarkable about Hamid’s narrative is that war is not, in fact, able to marginalize the “precious mundanity” of everyday life. Instead — and herein lies Hamid’s genius as a storyteller...

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 15 2017

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Plenty of biographies find poignancy in their subjects wanting to remain relevant, but given the real-world impact Heston’s advocacy had, it is an abdication of duty for Eliot to avoid digging deeper.

AV Club

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 13 2017

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An engrossing read for Hemingway buffs as well as casual readers, “Writer, Sailor, Soldier, Spy” adds more fascinating details to a life that remains continually fascinating.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 10 2017

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Very little is forgettable in these lapidary stories. Particularly the collection’s dedication: “For all refugees, everywhere.”

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 09 2017

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The authors do a great job of introducing just enough technical information to make their points, while keeping explanations clear enough so that those of a nontechnical bent — like this reviewer — can follow them.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2017

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For Kahn, there was never a line between love and work, and Lesser effectively shows how each of his long-term relationships was crucial to his development as an architect.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 21 2017

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...this is also an urgently political, profoundly moral book, albeit one so playful and so fantastical that the reader may hardly notice.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 23 2017

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...the novel falls into its own aesthetic traps. The dialogue sometimes feels too cinematically coy, and there is a veneer of politeness to the prose even in moments of conflict. But the ideas at its core are deceptively deep. “The Fortunate Ones” is a subtle, emotionally layered novel

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

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“The Girl From Venice” is a well-researched, well-written and entertaining thriller with an interesting historical backdrop.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 01 2017

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John Stubbs, as one might expect from his earlier, widely acclaimed biography of the 17th century English poet John Donne, has done a masterful job of capturing Swift’s restless, sometimes tortured spirit...

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 17 2017

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