By the end, it’s as if Baldwin were wrestling with just what Nevertheless was supposed to be (besides an excuse to cash a cheque). If he had fought more with himself, and less with everyone else, then Alec Baldwin might have penned a memoir for the ages. Let’s call it a draw.

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 13 2017

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The physician-turned-journalist Elisabeth Rosenthal offers a very different answer in her eye-opening “An American Sickness.”...Where Rosenthal’s account falls short is in explaining why this deeply broken system persists.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 04 2017

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It’s a compassionate, insightful novel, as rich thematically as it is narratively compelling. Through the characters of both Scott Burroughs and Bill Milligan – an outspoken news anchor who was also on the plane – Hawley explores the discord between fame and reality...

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 02 2017

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Much of "Dear Ijeawele" will feel familiar to those who know Adichie's previous works, but this book is more personal, more urgent. "I want to help create the world my daughter will love, to hasten the coming of true justice. I want the world to be better," she says.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 21 2017

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...my friend Rod Dreher, whose new book, “The Benedict Option,” is already the most discussed and most important religious book of the decade.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 14 2017

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In a recent New Yorker essay, Saunders wrote that “literature is a form of fondness-for-life. It is love for life taking verbal form,” and this love suffuses Lincoln in the Bardo. This is a novel that’s so intimate and human, so profound, that it seems like an act of grace.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

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Through the darkness of war, the circus lights twinkle on, the circus family lives and loves and laughs, all while beautiful athletes fly high above the crowd. It may seem a bit too neat and Hallmarkian to some, but Jenoff has written a tribute to the human spirit that soars in the midst of epic despair.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 21 2017

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...it is lively, provocative and sure to be another hit among the pooh-bahs. But readers ought to be prepared: Almost every blithe pronouncement Harari makes (that “the free individual is just a fictional tale concocted by an assembly of biochemical algorithms,” for instance) has been the exclusive subject of far more nuanced books...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Feb 15 2017

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Unsurprisingly, Darnielle's prose is lucid and precise, the sort of clear-eyed, knife-jab sentences that defined both his debut Wolf in White Van and his whole songwriting career.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 11 2017

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While “Shadowbahn” is a more complicated (and sometimes more interesting) novel than Erickson’s previous ones, its concerns are as genuine as its characters — believable people traveling through a degenerating political landscape while trying to remember how they got to where they are before they reach the end of the road.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 10 2017

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Hayes has now written a memoir of his own, “Insomniac City.” It’s a loving tribute to Sacks and to New York. He provides tender insights into living with both. But Sacks was by far the more eccentric of his two loves.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 08 2017

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...if everyone could adopt the level of healthy statistical scepticism that Mr Levitin would like, political debate would be in much better shape. This book is an indispensable trainer.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 04 2017

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It may seem incongruous to call a novel as violent as “Days Without End” dreamlike, but Barry’s narrator is a gentle witness to brutality: neither reluctant nor rabid, but a semi-willing instrument — which is to say, like most of those who participate in war.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 03 2017

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Berry’s fans will love his latest endeavor as he brings more detail into Malone’s past and how he came to be known as Cotton. The villains are a bit over the top, and their ultimate goal is somewhat confusing, but it doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 04 2017

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This book is haunting; it is smart and engaging. It was so engrossing that I read it in a day. But it’s also a deeply uneven book whose power in some moments only illuminates the absence of this force elsewhere.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 03 2017

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His hope is that readers will feel compelled to retell these stories. He doesn’t mention something else, but I can hear it in his voice, something we could all use a little more of just now, in the dark: delight.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 15 2017

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All this seems like obvious padding, but to give Finkel the benefit of the doubt, it may simply be that his affinity for his amazing hermit got the best of him. He does a remarkable job persuading one of the world’s more recalcitrant individuals to open up...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 21 2017

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The authors do a great job of introducing just enough technical information to make their points, while keeping explanations clear enough so that those of a nontechnical bent — like this reviewer — can follow them.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2017

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Even if his own Southern white do-gooder bias occasionally peeks out from behind the otherwise elegant and sophisticated prose, Tyson effectively recasts the killing of an innocent black boy, re-investigates the subsequent trial that took place...

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

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Many have tried to assess Ike. Few succeed. Mr. Baier does, with the inspired selection of the closing event of Ike’s presidency as a touchstone in a passionate search for the diverse, complex and energizing “spirit of Ike.”

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 19 2017

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...whatever else they’ll say about Knott, this book will also prove that he cared deeply about humanity and wrote, in part, to make all of life’s bitter turns more bearable.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 13 2017

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This volume delves into philosophical and spiritual quandaries as the creatures struggle for context and understanding. Throw in the new layers of Atlantis folklore and the mysterious new immortals and you’ve got one of Rice’s most imaginative tales yet.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 10 2017

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The meaning of civil war, as Mr Armitage shows, is as messy and multifaceted as the conflict it describes. His book offers an illuminating guide through the 2,000-year muddle and does a good job of filling a conspicuous void in the literature of conflict.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 09 2017

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We may never know if these sketches were drawn by Van Gogh. Fortunately, most people like a good mystery — and this one could endure for many years.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 06 2017

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Sims combines extensive scholarship with excellent writing and organizational skills to produce a work that is not only informative but eminently readable.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 03 2017

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This is a hard book to get through, even discounting its length; it’s painful and demanding and sometimes nihilistic, not exactly chicken soup for the ailing American soul. But with its wrath and violence, “A Book of American Martyrs” offers this teaspoon of warmth in these troubled times...

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 03 2017

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