Operatic in its reach, this is still essentially a tough crime procedural, with courtroom drama that is far more blistering than the John Grisham variety. Mississippi Blood is Southern Gothic delivered in the most incarnadine of hues.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 13 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Financial Times

His tone of voice is readily identifiable. It’s the careful expository tone of a tale told to children, of a good, scary story that will keep them listening. I can see how this could get irritating, but it is at the heart of his technique and success.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 12 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Her 596-page book, “Prince Charles: The Passions and Paradoxes of an Improbable Life,” is not an authorized biography, but the palace assisted with access to public appearances, interviews and research.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 10 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

The physician-turned-journalist Elisabeth Rosenthal offers a very different answer in her eye-opening “An American Sickness.”...Where Rosenthal’s account falls short is in explaining why this deeply broken system persists.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 04 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

It’s a compassionate, insightful novel, as rich thematically as it is narratively compelling. Through the characters of both Scott Burroughs and Bill Milligan – an outspoken news anchor who was also on the plane – Hawley explores the discord between fame and reality...

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 02 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Much of "Dear Ijeawele" will feel familiar to those who know Adichie's previous works, but this book is more personal, more urgent. "I want to help create the world my daughter will love, to hasten the coming of true justice. I want the world to be better," she says.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 21 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

...my friend Rod Dreher, whose new book, “The Benedict Option,” is already the most discussed and most important religious book of the decade.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 14 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

Even if his own Southern white do-gooder bias occasionally peeks out from behind the otherwise elegant and sophisticated prose, Tyson effectively recasts the killing of an innocent black boy, re-investigates the subsequent trial that took place...

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

Read Full Review | See more by LA Times

Many have tried to assess Ike. Few succeed. Mr. Baier does, with the inspired selection of the closing event of Ike’s presidency as a touchstone in a passionate search for the diverse, complex and energizing “spirit of Ike.”

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 19 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Washington Times

This volume delves into philosophical and spiritual quandaries as the creatures struggle for context and understanding. Throw in the new layers of Atlantis folklore and the mysterious new immortals and you’ve got one of Rice’s most imaginative tales yet.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 10 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

In his work, Chabon consistently shows unusual affection for his characters. They may be flawed individuals, but their virtues are bestowed generously and their difficulties are lightened by the author’s optimistic sympathy.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 27 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Financial Times

Rowe is not a truly bad writer. But she enters into a world of pain and violence and comes away only with a book about herself.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 26 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

Unfortunately, the latter parts of The Bear and the Nightingale shear away much of what I loved about its beginning and middle...These problems aside, The Bear and the Nightingale is a pleasure to spend time with. A rich and elegant debut...

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 22 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

By the end, it’s as if Baldwin were wrestling with just what Nevertheless was supposed to be (besides an excuse to cash a cheque). If he had fought more with himself, and less with everyone else, then Alec Baldwin might have penned a memoir for the ages. Let’s call it a draw.

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 13 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Globe and Mail

That dichotomy between brooding schemer and extroverted leader has long defined the Nixon dynamic. But with The Life, Farrell has etched those history-shaking contradictions into the most vivid — and the most startling — relief to date.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 12 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

Berry’s fans will love his latest endeavor as he brings more detail into Malone’s past and how he came to be known as Cotton. The villains are a bit over the top, and their ultimate goal is somewhat confusing, but it doesn’t matter in the grand scheme of things.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 04 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Washington Times

This book is haunting; it is smart and engaging. It was so engrossing that I read it in a day. But it’s also a deeply uneven book whose power in some moments only illuminates the absence of this force elsewhere.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 03 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

What finally left me feeling dissatisfied is, paradoxically, the pleasant, ingratiating way in which he tells it. These gods are not only mortal, they’re a bit banal. They talk a great deal, in a conversational tone that descends sometimes to smart-ass repartee.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 29 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

All this seems like obvious padding, but to give Finkel the benefit of the doubt, it may simply be that his affinity for his amazing hermit got the best of him. He does a remarkable job persuading one of the world’s more recalcitrant individuals to open up...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 21 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

In a recent New Yorker essay, Saunders wrote that “literature is a form of fondness-for-life. It is love for life taking verbal form,” and this love suffuses Lincoln in the Bardo. This is a novel that’s so intimate and human, so profound, that it seems like an act of grace.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 03 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Financial Times

Through the darkness of war, the circus lights twinkle on, the circus family lives and loves and laughs, all while beautiful athletes fly high above the crowd. It may seem a bit too neat and Hallmarkian to some, but Jenoff has written a tribute to the human spirit that soars in the midst of epic despair.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 21 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

...it is lively, provocative and sure to be another hit among the pooh-bahs. But readers ought to be prepared: Almost every blithe pronouncement Harari makes (that “the free individual is just a fictional tale concocted by an assembly of biochemical algorithms,” for instance) has been the exclusive subject of far more nuanced books...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Feb 15 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

A little more clear-eyed realism might have redeemed this novel, but as it stands, it reads like the screenplay to some heartwarmingly twee movie with a ukulele soundtrack. It's a misstep by a writer who's capable of much better writing than this.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 29 2017

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

It is the memoir of an addiction still going on, being negotiated everyday. There is, however, a noble Afterword in which Marnell shares the progress she’s made and slyly admonishes those who revel in and exploit the cool Manhattan party stories but disregard the pain that accompanies them.

Globe and Mail

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 27 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Globe and Mail

Mr. S offers a curious sort of double-voyeurism, with Jacobs inviting readers to vicariously experience his own vicarious access to the life of one of pop-culture's preeminent icons. Sinatra's story is so compelling and larger-than-life, though, that even a secondhand account like Jacobs' packs a powerful punch.

AV Club

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 23 2017

Read Full Review | See more by AV Club

As its title suggests, The Case Against Sugar makes no attempt to be a balanced book. Yet Taubes is a serious science writer who refrains from exaggerating the evidence.

Financial Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 20 2017

Read Full Review | See more by Financial Times