Week of 14 May 2017
Golden Prey (A Prey Novel)
Sandford’s trademark blend of rough humor and deadly action keeps the pages turning until the smile-inducing wrap-up, which reveals the fates of a number of his quirky, memorable characters.
Publishers Weekly

Golden Prey

by John Sandford

THE HANDMAID'S TALE
Atwood, to her credit, creates a chillingly specific, imaginable night-mare. The book is short on characterization--this is Atwood, never a warm writer, at her steeliest--and long on cynicism--it's got none of the human credibility of a work such as Walker Percy's Love In The Ruins. But the scariness is visceral...
Kirkus

THE HANDMAID'S TALE

by Margaret Atwood

Anything Is Possible: A Novel
Another powerful examination of painfully human ambiguities and ambivalences—this gifted writer just keeps getting better.
Kirkus

Anything Is Possible

by Elizabeth Strout

The Woman in Cabin 10
Despite this successful formula, and a whole lot of slowly unraveling tension, the end is somehow unsatisfying. And the newspaper and social media inserts add little depth.
Kirkus


The Woman in Cabin 10

by Ruth Ware

Wicked Abyss (Immortals After Dark)
As with any book in this series, I enjoyed Wicked Abyss from beginning to end. I love this world and am so exited to see where this author takes her readers in the future.
Fiction Vixen

Wicked Abyss

by Kresley Cole

Lilac Girls: A Novel
Despite some horrific scenes, this is a page-turner demonstrating the tests and triumphs civilians faced during war, complemented by Kelly’s vivid depiction of history and excellent characters.
Publishers Weekly


Lilac Girls

by Martha Hall Kelly

Beartown: A Novel
A thoroughly empathetic examination of the fragile human spirit, Backman’s latest will resonate a long time.
Kirkus


Beartown

by Fredrik Backman

The Nightingale
The author ably depicts war’s horrors through the eyes of these two women, whose strength of character shines through no matter their differences.
Publishers Weekly


The Nightingale

by Kristin Hannah

The Fix (Amos Decker series)
Those readers thinking they can outguess the author will find their abilities tested as they follow Amos Decker to the surprising conclusion of The Fix.
NY Journal of Books

The Fix

by David Baldacci

The Black Book
Most readers will be ahead of the twin investigators in identifying the guilty party. But the mystery is authentic, the lead-up genuinely suspenseful, and the leading characters and situations more memorable than Patterson’s managed in quite a while.
Kirkus

The Black Book

by James Patterson

Untitled
Deservedly popular Moriarty invigorates the tired social-issue formula of women’s fiction through wit, good humor, sharp insight into human nature and addictive storytelling.
Kirkus

Untitled

by Liane Moriarty

No Easy Target: A Novel
...while the sexual tension between Margaret and Lassiter may make a few hearts flutter, the best character in the book by far is a beautiful, pregnant dog. The author’s told this story many times before, but it never gets old to her many devotees.
Kirkus


No Easy Target

by Iris Johansen

A Man Called Ove: A Novel
"A Man Called Ove" is a tale of a sourpuss who is trying to commit suicide - hardly the theme for a delightful story. Backman's debut novel, though, is truly an amusing and entertaining novel.
https://www.csbsju.edu

A Man Called Ove

by Fredrik Backman

The Last Mile (Amos Decker series)
...while the case starts out with plenty of potential, Decker’s incredible memory really isn’t flexed much here, so it’s ultimately solved by ordinary detective work. Riddled with implausible situations and light on the research, this plodding tale is for die-hard Baldacci fans only.
Kirkus


The Last Mile

by David Baldacci

milk and honey
This book is perfect for getting you through any breakup. Some poems hit you with the power of two lines, while others need two pages to sink in.
http://www.dailyuw.com

milk and honey

by rupi kaur