It’s a stirring book whose critique of contemporary work culture will be instantly recognisable. It also doubles as a moving memoir of a working-class intellectual.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 14 2017

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At times “Admissions” is brutally honest. At others it is heartfelt and touched with wry humor. It truly is one doctor’s admissions of his mistakes (sometimes death isn’t the worst that can happen) as well as his successes.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Oct 30 2017

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This is a book that writes the story of itself into its smallest corners. The prose is so purely delightful that I kept folding down pages to return to. I laughed at exceptional turns of phrase, only to find myself tearing up a few passages later...

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 13 2017

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Grann’s accomplished and necessary account of injustice, avarice and racist violence, tells a story both old and new.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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At a time when Americans may fantasize returning to a kinder and gentler style of politics, Blumenthal reminds us that every age has been fraught with anxiety and dread, and that in government, times are always tough, and the future uncertain.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 14 2017

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The intriguing story of how Pickersgill and the other executors tried to honour King's wishes, yet also protect and preserve his legacy, is told in this engaging narrative by Trent University history professor Christopher Dummitt.

Globe and Mail

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 12 2017

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...Russo’s skill is such that these flaws are easy to forgive. Thoughtful and warmhearted, his fiction has the engaging quality of tales told by a friend

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 09 2017

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The result is a sharp critique of medieval social strictures, with stunning battle scenes, monsters and blood. My nephew devoured all 134 pages of it.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 11 2017

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The characters’ arcs were explored in more depth, the story moved forward, there was plenty of action, a lot of questions were answered (but not all of them), and there is no cliffhanger. All in all, it is the best book I have read so far this year.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 11 2017

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The lesson we learn is that everything is unreliable: our memories, our cover stories, and the grander narratives nations tell to justify their actions. And only Le Carré, it becomes clear, could have made this point so convincingly.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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How Sandberg’s two children will feel in years to come about their mother’s willingness to publicly detail significant moments of their grieving for their father is moot. But, occasional winces aside, the book contains important messages both for individuals and for employers.

Financial Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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I would be lying if I said that “Nixon’s White House Wars” was a pleasure to read. As one who lived through the period, the experience was like a survivor reading a gripping account of the Titanic disaster. Still, I wouldn’t have missed the experience for the world.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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I have to admit that there was one thing I missed in this book so very much – humor. Of course this is not a light-hearted book in the same way as Amanda Quick’s early books were, and I did not expect humor and laughter on every page or even every other page, but I would have loved to see more humorous touches .

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 09 2017

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In the end, though, what will, I think, earn most readers’ respect, is Ms. Bosworth’s combination of acknowledging her pain without giving way to self-pity...

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 14 2017

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The Gray House is a Marmite book: worshipped by some, criticised by others as meandering nonsense, lacking either true magic or convincing realism. The plot can feel frustratingly serpentine...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 13 2017

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There are dozens of other lines that seem similarly quiet and innocuous – until they burst in your head like star showers. Those alone make it worth making the long drive to this small town again … in spite of the occasionally disappointing scenery.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 25 2017

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Every novel is a small town, and you’ll leave it eventually, in search of other connections, different worlds. But when you close a novel as good as “Broken River,” something, not quite a ghost, may follow you.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 09 2017

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So the suspense part felt as if there should have been more bang for the amount of buck and time spent setting it up but the romance is a winner.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 12 2017

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This is a profound interrogation of freedom and fate, as well as a fascinating portrait of a vanished time, written in prose as clear and washed clean as the world after a storm.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 12 2017

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In this spry and accomplished comedy of manners, a set of six characters — teenage, middle-aged and elderly — muddle their way through love, discovering that its tribulations are awkward at every age.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 02 2017

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Mr West is an entertaining, chatty guide to the things that interest him. That is mostly to the good, although the chattiness does mean that “Scale” suffers from a problem of scale.

The Economist

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 11 2017

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Seeing People Off is a fascinating novel, although it's certainly not for everyone. Fans of inward-looking postmodernists like Clarice Lispector will find much to admire here...

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 11 2017

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Smith makes many telling, shrewd points in pursuit of realigning the popular image of Prince Charles, but the observation that stuck with me, one that brings us full circle, is a perfect illustration of her acumen.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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In her first work of prose, “Priestdaddy,” the poet Patricia Lockwood proves herself a formidably gifted writer who can do pretty much anything she pleases.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 09 2017

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All in all, this was tons of fun to read maybe with the exception of the low flow toilet story. Life isn’t what you expect so snuggle with the love of your life should you find yours, smile at the Air France people just to disconcert them, chow down on cake and enjoy what comes next.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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“Rising Star” seems to include every human being who came within arm’s length of the young president-to-be. The depth of detail allows the reader to see familiar parts of this story with fresh eyes.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 09 2017

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