Week of 18 Jun 2017
Come Sundown

No Critic Review

Come Sundown

by Nora Roberts

Shadow Reaper (A Shadow Rider Novel)

No Critic Review

Shadow Reaper

by Christine Feehan

The Girl With The Make-Believe Husband: A Bridgertons Prequel

No Critic Review

The Girl With The Make-Believe Husband

by Julia Quinn

THE HANDMAID'S TALE
Atwood, to her credit, creates a chillingly specific, imaginable night-mare. The book is short on characterization--this is Atwood, never a warm writer, at her steeliest--and long on cynicism--it's got none of the human credibility of a work such as Walker Percy's Love In The Ruins. But the scariness is visceral...
Kirkus

THE HANDMAID'S TALE

by Margaret Atwood

Dragon Teeth: A Novel

No Critic Review

Dragon Teeth

by Michael Crichton

16th Seduction (Women's Murder Club)

No Critic Review

16th Seduction

by James Patterson

The Woman in Cabin 10
Despite this successful formula, and a whole lot of slowly unraveling tension, the end is somehow unsatisfying. And the newspaper and social media inserts add little depth.
Kirkus


The Woman in Cabin 10

by Ruth Ware

Nighthawk (The NUMA Files)

No Critic Review

Nighthawk

by Clive Cussler

Into the Water: A Novel

No Critic Review

Into the Water

by Paula Hawkins

White Hot (Hidden Legacy)

No Critic Review

White Hot

by Ilona Andrews

Curious Minds: A Knight and Moon Novel
What’s missing from the usual Evanovich solo and duet performances is low comedy. Beneath the obligatory trappings of the hero’s non sequiturs and pet armadillo, there’s surprisingly little in this wildly overscaled caper to tickle the funny bone.
Kirkus


Curious Minds

by Janet Evanovich

The Fix (Amos Decker series)

No Critic Review

The Fix

by David Baldacci

No Middle Name: The Complete Collected Jack Reacher Short Stories

No Critic Review

No Middle Name

by Lee Child

Night School: A Jack Reacher Novel
The premise of the pre-9/11 plot is both compelling and disconcerting, and Child applies his trademark eye for detail to make the whole endeavor surprisingly and thrillingly credible.
Publishers Weekly


Night School

by Lee Child