There are so many concurrent story lines in “The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley” that to reveal too many details here would risk stealing the reader’s pure enjoyment of such an adventurous and transformative tale.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 23 2017

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It could be dull, but instead it's mesmerizing, like watching spinning chickens. Since many of the things he describes happen in his stories, reading Theft by Finding feels like watching a favorite play from behind the scenes, in the company of a friend who can identify what is absurd and heartbreaking and human about every person on stage.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 04 2017

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As in other Andrews books, descriptions are utilitarian, but the dialogue shines with humor and wit. I have just one more minor nitpick—while the entire rest of the book is narrated by Nevada in first person, the epilogue switches to third person in Rogan’s viewpoint. That felt jarringly late in the book to introduce his POV.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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...what comes across strongly in this highly enjoyable book is the fierce commitment of both Orwell and Churchill to critical thought.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 23 2017

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Into the Water isn’t as slick or as clever – or as relatable – as The Girl on the Train, but it’s creepy enough, provided you can stay on top of the multiple voices and the deaths piling up through the centuries. The supernatural tinge given by the psychic might not be to everyone’s liking...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 16 2017

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His hope is that readers will feel compelled to retell these stories. He doesn’t mention something else, but I can hear it in his voice, something we could all use a little more of just now, in the dark: delight.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 15 2017

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The lesson we learn is that everything is unreliable: our memories, our cover stories, and the grander narratives nations tell to justify their actions. And only Le Carré, it becomes clear, could have made this point so convincingly.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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How Sandberg’s two children will feel in years to come about their mother’s willingness to publicly detail significant moments of their grieving for their father is moot. But, occasional winces aside, the book contains important messages both for individuals and for employers.

Financial Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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“Rising Star” seems to include every human being who came within arm’s length of the young president-to-be. The depth of detail allows the reader to see familiar parts of this story with fresh eyes.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 09 2017

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Thus, the first book paved the way for this one. The authors had been straight with the sources they’d interviewed the first time around; and this time out, they were ready to tell their stories, encouraged by the authors’ agreement, as they explain in an end note, to withhold the names of those requesting anonymity.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 01 2017

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Unfortunately, the artworks in The Electric Sublime don't get much more recent than that; Prince and his illustrators seem to think art stopped evolving sometime around the 1920s.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 29 2017

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Piatigorsky is clearly passionate about his main theme, which is the human factor underlying the affairs of court and state, but the task he set for himself has overwhelmed him.

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Apr 28 2017

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He finds parents still suffering (one was found wandering in the forest calling for his daughter) and is impressed by the bravery of the girls who were able to escape. A memorable portrait of individual resilience in a divided, strife-torn nation.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 28 2017

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...Grodstein, with poignancy and mordant humor (“Without a crisis, really, I’d have nothing to do today but go to the emergency room”) helps us see and sympathize with a mother’s illogical desperation.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 19 2017

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...there is something reductive about the last third of the book...They may feel it takes too long to get to the action, but I loved watching the author walk the tightrope of deeper questions, was thrilled to see him push the boundaries of human understanding for its own merits...

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 02 2017

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Somehow, Strout’s writing understands us, with all our vanities, our small moments of heroism, our fears and our failings. And as each of her characters eventually discovers, what a rare and powerful feeling it is to be understood.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 26 2017

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David Cay Johnston, who recently made headlines by releasing a portion of Trump’s 2005 tax return, knows whatever can be known about Trump’s career, which he covered as a journalist for three decades, and he has the necessary courage for the disagreeable work.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 18 2017

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Overall, though, the book’s epistemological choreography, as the Merry and Roger meetings are intertwined with the ongoing investigation – involving forensic anthropology, satellite imagery, and on-the-ground detective work – is expertly handled.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 27 2017

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Grann’s accomplished and necessary account of injustice, avarice and racist violence, tells a story both old and new.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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Smith makes many telling, shrewd points in pursuit of realigning the popular image of Prince Charles, but the observation that stuck with me, one that brings us full circle, is a perfect illustration of her acumen.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 10 2017

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I have to admit that there was one thing I missed in this book so very much – humor. Of course this is not a light-hearted book in the same way as Amanda Quick’s early books were, and I did not expect humor and laughter on every page or even every other page, but I would have loved to see more humorous touches .

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 09 2017

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Mr. Baldacci has come up with another winner of a thriller and the reader can expect to hear more about the agent who sees everything in blue.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 04 2017

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He is – as he admits – no expert, but he certainly has lots of good ideas. The Village News may be a light read but someone in Whitehall should really take it seriously.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 29 2017

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These are the difficult questions that Antonia Honeywell asks through in her powerful debut novel. The stream-of-consciousness style makes it not the easiest read, and Lalla can be a frustrating window on this world. But in the end, it’s a provocative novel...

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 28 2017

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The “tell off” speeches were sweet to hear and the changes in Caroline and Nat nice to see but it all felt “on cue.” Nothing surprised me. As a mindless beach read, it’s great but I doubt I’ll remember much about it.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Apr 28 2017

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"Borne,” Jeff Vandermeer’s lyrical and harrowing new novel, may be the most beautifully written, and believable, post-apocalyptic tale in recent memory...

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 27 2017

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