The book is an attempt to see fat in its complexity, its contrariness – as potentially more than a physical problem to be overcome. And although Gay regrets she is unable to go as far as the campaigners who rejoice in their size, she does want us to rethink what fatness can mean.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 30 2017

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There are so many concurrent story lines in “The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley” that to reveal too many details here would risk stealing the reader’s pure enjoyment of such an adventurous and transformative tale.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 23 2017

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It could be dull, but instead it's mesmerizing, like watching spinning chickens. Since many of the things he describes happen in his stories, reading Theft by Finding feels like watching a favorite play from behind the scenes, in the company of a friend who can identify what is absurd and heartbreaking and human about every person on stage.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 04 2017

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Now he has joined forces with Ida’s granddaughter to publish her letters, and they offer a compelling glimpse of a lost age of bohemia that raises provocative questions about what it means to live freely.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 02 2017

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Although “Radiate” can be confusing as it jumps back and forth in time, fleshing out the past while pushing the thrust of the narrative forward, it is rewarding for readers who stick with it.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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Arikha intertwines her story with the story she draws from her father. She tells both carefully, pacing out the lines so that at times they look and sound like poetry. It’s not, though, nor is it meant to be.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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But it's clear early on that Beyond Respectability is a work of crucial cultural study. It introduces concepts of the black woman as a public citizen in post-Restoration America, and explores women whose work pushed against the dominant narrative...

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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A basic problem with Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s well-written and at times eloquent book is the difficulty she has in explaining why so many members of the middle class she purports to be fighting for voted for Donald Trump...

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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As in other Andrews books, descriptions are utilitarian, but the dialogue shines with humor and wit. I have just one more minor nitpick—while the entire rest of the book is narrated by Nevada in first person, the epilogue switches to third person in Rogan’s viewpoint. That felt jarringly late in the book to introduce his POV.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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But however unconventional An English Guide to Birdwatching may be, it must satisfy; to fail to do so, as this novel does, is to commit the cardinal sin of self-indulgence.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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Descent is a slim book, but it packs plenty of surprises per page. Perry veers from mild satire to sobering analysis to confessional candor, all while hopping between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, economics, anthropology, sociology, and psychology.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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As this book slides forward, it shifts from first person to third. Lacey moves us in and out of the minds of several other characters, some of them vastly different from Mary, without for a moment breaking that spell.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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...she’s a pistol, always worth reading about, but her role in “Earthly Remains” is minor. Still, like the foregoing Guido Brunetti novels, “Earthly Remains” is a rewarding novel.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 29 2017

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Some of the stories are slight...The best stories, though, pry open the impassive surfaces of human behavior to reveal “the bloody weight of desire and the rusty anchor of remorse.”

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 30 2017

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...Grodstein, with poignancy and mordant humor (“Without a crisis, really, I’d have nothing to do today but go to the emergency room”) helps us see and sympathize with a mother’s illogical desperation.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 19 2017

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...there is something reductive about the last third of the book...They may feel it takes too long to get to the action, but I loved watching the author walk the tightrope of deeper questions, was thrilled to see him push the boundaries of human understanding for its own merits...

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 02 2017

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The most compelling reason to read “Beartown” is that it is written by Fredrik Backman. Each of his books have been a pleasure to read — well-paced and with characters so well developed you feel as if you know them and how they think and see things; you feel as though you’re watching and listening not reading.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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That would have been fun to read. There’s a lot of sameness in this one, but then it’s book 7 so perhaps it’s all catching up with me. It’s mainly the secondary characters I’ve already praised who raise this to a B.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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The poem begins like this: “Fanaticism? No. Writing is exciting/and baseball is like writing./You can never tell with either/how it will go/or what you will do...” Moore please.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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Teju Cole has composed a lyrical essay in photographs paired with texts, with each set identified by its locale, including — to name only a few — Auckland, Brooklyn, Brazzaville, Hadath El Jebbeh, Lagos, McMinnville, Paris, Queens, São Paulo...

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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Every version of the story in the book is incomplete, but under Christopher Tolkien's steady editorial hand, the fragments assemble themselves to give us an impression of the whole.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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The leading characters in his probing and radiantly polished account, his Aunt Harriet Frank Jr. and Uncle Irving Ravetch, were MGM screenwriters (“Hud,” “Norma Rae”), which is to say not loftily perched on the movie-business totem pole.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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...exactly the sort of intelligent, enthralled, playful and empathetic literature that Gowdy has been delivering for the last three decades.

Globe and Mail

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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...she underestimates the man who loves her and who already knows her secret before he engineers an opportunity to propose and then cements his feelings by willingly taking on those holiday traditions she’s longed for. For her, he’ll undo his plans and willingly make new ones.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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Folksy, funny illustrations by newcomer Danny Noble (who Edmondson signed up after spotting her on Twitter) add to the charm. But the book also provides a touching examination of childhood loss.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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It is also strangely impersonal. Was ever an author so present in, and yet so absent from, his own work? It is always unmistakably Ackroyd, just personally uninvolved.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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