If journalism is the first rough draft of history, Green’s draft serves primarily as a chronology. It details the relationship between Bannon and Trump without giving satisfactory reasons for why it works… and for how long it will continue.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 06 2017

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British author and television documentary producer Andrew Cook is eminently qualified to explore the many facets of this terrible tale, chilling in so many ways, that it can still send shivers down one’s spine.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 06 2017

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This is clever. Annoying, smarmy and intrusive in a completely childish way, but clever because his narrator (undependable in the extreme) is all those things, too.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 05 2017

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“The Sum of Small Things” both unearths evocative differences between big American cities...However, that may yield a lopsided portrait of the top of the income pile: largely absent from her tale are the business-minded rich in politically conservative states.

The Economist

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 05 2017

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Mbue’s prose is mostly straightforward and unadorned but her characters are complex, with contradictory motivations, which provide the story with depth and quiet power.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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The narrative’s pace stalls at times from too much exposition about supernatural theories and occultists like Aleister Crowley, and about aspects of technology easily inferred from context. And Percy’s penchant for poetic prose — usually a strength of his style — was distracting here. But “The Dark Net” is still a frightening novel.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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...Rich People Problems, the final act of Kevin Kwan's Crazy Rich Asians trilogy, is one of this summer's best breezy beach reads, an audacious satire that lifts the curtain on the jet-set 1 per cent of Southeast Asian multibillionaires.

Globe and Mail

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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Grann’s accomplished and necessary account of injustice, avarice and racist violence, tells a story both old and new.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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This book doesn’t make the obstacles Randy and Cass face easy. His past makes him want a loving marriage and family while hers has her backing away from any long term involvement.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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...he compares the pairing of emojis and conventional written language to an actor's nuanced interpretation of Shakespeare's words. Although he does so in a forceful fashion, his analogy feels like an overreach.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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The position-paper material — global warming, for instance, and the health care arguments that have been aired to exhaustion — take up a good deal of space and are strictly for true believers, although Sen. Franken tries to keep people awake by interjecting jokes and wisecracks.

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 02 2017

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“Fast” is a great book about the nature of social life in the 21st century, a book in which past and future unfold in “every cell” across the vast space of a few words.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 02 2017

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As the tension builds, protests are planned. Yet for all that the book gestures at a kind of political allegory, it shies away from the capital-S Scene it seems to promise and tapers away into anticlimax...Still, “The Locals” is a quietly engrossing narrative...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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A heartfelt exploration of mortality and life, this memoir also explores the complex pulls and pushes of human relationships, and the deep debt we owe to family, friends, and modern medicine.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 06 2017

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His own position is perhaps best intuited from the sheer verve of this novel, the delight it takes in its capacity to entertain. Joey, having listened to Nat’s explanation, curls his lip in disgust. “You’re sure,” he asks, “this film isn’t in black and white?” Eureka, on the other hand, is in glorious Technicolor.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 05 2017

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The writing is spare yet descriptive; the story is inventive and intricate. The ending is something I didn’t see coming yet I loved that with it, Siew Tsin takes control of her existence even as she takes a chance on her future.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 05 2017

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Long Soldier’s emphasis on typography doesn’t mean she ignores prosody. She describes her newborn daughter’s eyes as “untied from northern poles from/ hard unseen winter months.” Her moving poems about motherhood are not anomalies in this deeply political text.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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The rising tension is created through short, economic sentences, a narrative detachment from even the most distressing scenes and a quiet menace...This is unbeatable storytelling — an immediate and engaging study of humanity at its best and worst.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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Interleaving snapshots of a lost world, the primal power of nature and high science, “The Great Quake” is an outstanding work of nonfiction. It’s also a reminder that the original agent of creative destruction resides not in the corporate boardroom, ivory tower or artist’s salon but beneath our feet.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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I had barely mopped my eyes and started reading again when Leroy gets his (very public) revenge and I started all over again. OMG Lawrence Welk! Bet that’s one time when he didn’t say “Wunnerful, wunnerful.” So maybe I’m coming around to liking books with con artists. I certainly can’t wait to find out what these two will be up to next.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 04 2017

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It is probably safe to say that Christie would have appreciated Mr. Horowitz’s use of her portrayal of an updated England and would have enjoyed his smooth and dark humor.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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“Giving Godhead” blows several giant craters out through the walls of our inherited and now somewhat cowed Western selves. It is a bomb with an angel behind it.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 03 2017

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This is not, as the book’s subtitle suggests the unwomanly face of war. It is the face of war faced by women, just as so many American woman soldiers face in our 17-year-old battles in faraway places today. This book holds uncomfortable truths up for all to see.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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...even *why* was easy enough to guess if one is guessing very general motive. So partially it is my fault of course, because the blurb says thriller; however, I do not think it is so unreasonable to expect an interesting solution to the dead bodies in the narrative.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 02 2017

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It’s a somber and earnest sentiment for so outwardly playful a novel, but, at its least self-conscious, “The Seventh Function” is maybe also at its most Barthesian.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 16 2017

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As much as I enjoyed Beauty Like the Night (and I did. I so did), I’ve a feeling that it will be even better on re-read – much like my experience with The Black Hawk. To sum up; Beauty Like the Night is a delight.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 01 2017

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