The Golden House is not Brideshead or Gatsby – it is too rich and too riotous. Rather it is a modern Bonfire of the Vanities, New York seen from the inside and the outside, as only a writer of multiple selves such as Rushdie – Indian, British, now a New Yorker – could do.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 16 2017

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...there’s much to appreciate and enjoy in this book, from the passion and yearning between Livvy and Nicholas to the way they must learn to navigate not only external obstacles, but also internal ones.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 04 2017

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If you want to better understand the history and scope of the Vietnam War, if you want to understand what immigrants have endured, and continue to endure, you can start with no better book.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 04 2017

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There is a howl at the heart of this book that will echo in its readers’ heads for a long time. The narrator continues his Sisyphean journey, “hoping there was still somewhere on this earth where people had a heart, but the truth is I didn’t know”.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 02 2017

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This is a story that gallops to the finish with a surprise on every other page and I just gave myself to watching the forces for Good battle the forces of Evil as the plot wound tighter and tighter...

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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...a novel that's made distinct by its mood more than its story. The climax here melds together the mundane griefs and cruelties of adolescence with the eerie atmosphere of those dark woods and that asylum. Like most of Messud's other novels, The Burning Girl deeply excavates the subject of female loneliness.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 12 2017

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All of this makes for a witty, sneakily feminist kind of crime story. At one point Marion contemplates her lack of a moral compass, her inability to feel guilt, and laments that it has not taken her farther in life.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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The information was interesting but I didn’t learn much that I didn’t already know...As a wide ranging skim across the era, it’s a starting place but not really more than that.

Dear Author

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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This book, with its elisions, inaccuracies, vivid set pieces and palpable dislike for its subject, has I suspect achieved its end...

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Sep 18 2017

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True to Velázquez and his heirs, Olivares and García know that each of those flickering glimpses shows a different side of the truth. Their mirror has flaws, but it still catches plenty of light.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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This is not, as the book’s subtitle suggests the unwomanly face of war. It is the face of war faced by women, just as so many American woman soldiers face in our 17-year-old battles in faraway places today. This book holds uncomfortable truths up for all to see.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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Mostly, however, this is Knausgaard operating on a significantly lower gear. You get the sense he's ready for another big project, but hasn't yet settled on either the form or the content.

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Sep 15 2017

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Lloyd Parry is uncommonly sensitive to all such spirits, and in the tsunami he has found a horrifying metaphor for those subliminal forces that swirl underneath the manicured surfaces of Japan.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Dec 26 2017

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It's rare to find a book that delights without reservation. Reading A Skinful of Shadows is like studying a Vermeer painting, wherein a young woman with an enigmatic expression gazes defiantly at her audience.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Oct 15 2017

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Her argument is especially timely because in the coverage of candidate and then President Trump there are increasing examples of the more gloves-off style of journalism she advocates.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 04 2017

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All of which is to say that Robin Sloan's delightful new novel, "Sourdough," the follow-up to his runaway success "Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore," displays both lightness and a yearning for escape, but only in the best sense.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Oct 06 2017

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Traditionally, as with a good musician, the mark of a good novelist is the illusion of effortlessness. Lynch doesn’t do effortless...Yet Lynch’s lush, poetic prose deliberately and painfully acts as a foil to the reality of the famine.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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...this is less a righteous manifesto for the modern man than a highly personal story that might just resonate with others and give them confidence to talk, too.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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Bowden revisits the historic battle with the same character-driven, grunt-level reporting style that made “Black Hawk Down” a bestseller. He lends a sympathetic ear to surviving soldiers on both sides...

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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In a book full of baffling, queasy-making things, this is surely the most befuddling of all. Kraus, whose own novels are rather good, is so much the better writer, even if, this time around, her id seems sometimes to have wrestled her ego to the floor.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Sep 04 2017

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When Anne and Flannery finally meet, the novel kicks into gear. The sexual energy crests, but more rewarding is some sense of the Flannery of old returning: audacious, confident, smart, seductive. Then “Pages for Her” ends, almost abruptly, as if Brownrigg knows these are characters whose story still has places to go.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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This is Louise Penny’s most complex and bloody concoction, especially in the location of the lovely village which is Gamache’s home.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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Many books these days have high stakes and high angst (that’s not a complaint; I like those books as well) but Need You Now is much more understated. I expect readers who are looking for a romantic literary escape without too much drama will appreciate this one the most.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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The overall message remains important and it is generally conveyed with skill and emotional force. But I have reservations.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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Nothing in “I’ll Have What She’s Having” makes a persuasive case for why “Sleepless” and “Mail” can be considered in the same category of excellence as “Harry/Sally”...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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And now we have Sen. Flake’s effort, bearing the same title and leaving many people genuinely puzzled as to how he’s able to take the title of an existing work and make it his own. No doubt there was a special arrangement with the Goldwater Institute, where he once worked. But that’s not made clear.

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 27 2017

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