That would have been fun to read. There’s a lot of sameness in this one, but then it’s book 7 so perhaps it’s all catching up with me. It’s mainly the secondary characters I’ve already praised who raise this to a B.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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A basic problem with Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s well-written and at times eloquent book is the difficulty she has in explaining why so many members of the middle class she purports to be fighting for voted for Donald Trump...

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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Every version of the story in the book is incomplete, but under Christopher Tolkien's steady editorial hand, the fragments assemble themselves to give us an impression of the whole.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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But however unconventional An English Guide to Birdwatching may be, it must satisfy; to fail to do so, as this novel does, is to commit the cardinal sin of self-indulgence.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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Descent is a slim book, but it packs plenty of surprises per page. Perry veers from mild satire to sobering analysis to confessional candor, all while hopping between issues of race, class, gender, sexuality, economics, anthropology, sociology, and psychology.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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Folksy, funny illustrations by newcomer Danny Noble (who Edmondson signed up after spotting her on Twitter) add to the charm. But the book also provides a touching examination of childhood loss.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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...she’s a pistol, always worth reading about, but her role in “Earthly Remains” is minor. Still, like the foregoing Guido Brunetti novels, “Earthly Remains” is a rewarding novel.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 29 2017

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Rosen's chronological approach gives the narrative its fluency; his wit and vivid detail make "Miracle Cure" an absorbing read.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 29 2017

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Davis’s book is a celebration of her “realism”, which allows us to see minutely the differences in consciousness of different characters – before we return to our sole selves. As an omniscient narrator Eliot has often been called God-like, but Davis thinks even more of her wisdom than this.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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Okay so – I adored the novella-ette, I want more of Thea and “Whatever name he’s going by today” and I am writing a glowing review to hopefully encourage more adventures for them. After all, he still needs to impress her with his ninja moves.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 28 2017

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...it is fragmentary, more of a scrapbook than a book. Its target readership is presumably other people who want to write books, but haven’t quite got around to it yet...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 27 2017

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Somehow, Strout’s writing understands us, with all our vanities, our small moments of heroism, our fears and our failings. And as each of her characters eventually discovers, what a rare and powerful feeling it is to be understood.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 26 2017

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Of the three, Golden Passport is by far the most ambitious, and in McDonald's hands this history of the Harvard Business School, its successes and failures, misdeeds and misapprehensions, becomes a window into the increasingly corrupted soul of mercantile America.

Globe and Mail

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 26 2017

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The poem begins like this: “Fanaticism? No. Writing is exciting/and baseball is like writing./You can never tell with either/how it will go/or what you will do...” Moore please.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 01 2017

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As in other Andrews books, descriptions are utilitarian, but the dialogue shines with humor and wit. I have just one more minor nitpick—while the entire rest of the book is narrated by Nevada in first person, the epilogue switches to third person in Rogan’s viewpoint. That felt jarringly late in the book to introduce his POV.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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The leading characters in his probing and radiantly polished account, his Aunt Harriet Frank Jr. and Uncle Irving Ravetch, were MGM screenwriters (“Hud,” “Norma Rae”), which is to say not loftily perched on the movie-business totem pole.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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...exactly the sort of intelligent, enthralled, playful and empathetic literature that Gowdy has been delivering for the last three decades.

Globe and Mail

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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As this book slides forward, it shifts from first person to third. Lacey moves us in and out of the minds of several other characters, some of them vastly different from Mary, without for a moment breaking that spell.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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...she underestimates the man who loves her and who already knows her secret before he engineers an opportunity to propose and then cements his feelings by willingly taking on those holiday traditions she’s longed for. For her, he’ll undo his plans and willingly make new ones.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 30 2017

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It is also strangely impersonal. Was ever an author so present in, and yet so absent from, his own work? It is always unmistakably Ackroyd, just personally uninvolved.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on May 31 2017

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Only a formidable writer like Thomas Ricks would boldly reimagine their stories through the unique lens of this superbly crafted dual biography.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 28 2017

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River of Teeth is a wonderfully original debut, guaranteed to cast long, sinister shadows over beloved family board games for years to come.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 28 2017

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That Eleanor’s social awkwardness is extreme, sometimes painfully and often comically so, is far more apparent to the reader than it is to Eleanor herself — and that we get this through Eleanor’s own narration is a credit to the author’s cleverness and craft.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 28 2017

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Love and sex and money and betrayal make for excellent storytelling. And The Heirs has all of that in excess.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 27 2017

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I was going to give The Mayor of Casterbridge a B, a bit below Far From the Madding Crowd, but I think I’ve talked myself into a B+. I’m still not ready for Tess of D’Urbervilles though, I don’t think.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 26 2017

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Sometimes, there is no one there to meet the extended hand. Still, as “The Gift” shows, it’s possible for the reaching itself to act as a down payment on a new economy of pleasure.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 26 2017

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