The novel’s title recalls the final line of EE Cummings’s poem, “Somewhere I Have Never Travelled” (“nobody, not even the rain, has such small hands”), and I found myself returning to its verses as I pondered the full effects and meaning of the book.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 26 2017

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His opening chapter is a beautiful piece of writing, one that sets out why every soccer fan and player should be angry. Conn recalls watching the 1974 World Cup, hosted by West Germany, on TV as a boy in Manchester, England. Soccer was all around him, taken for granted.

Globe and Mail

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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It is grim but essential reading, and does much to explain the legacy of burning resentment in Ukraine, which led to the country’s clash with Vladimir Putin, a strongman seen by many as from the same mould as Stalin.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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Twitter, Facebook, the team blog and (no doubt) a stadium cam all play into getting these two back together but they still also need old fashioned face-to-face to work out what happened. By the end, I feel they have even if their jobs might make things a bit more hectic.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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All told, “Chester B. Himes” is a bracing journey through the life of an uncompromising writer who considered himself “an evil, highly sensitive, unsuccessful old man — but … not an American Negro in the usual connotation of the word.”

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 24 2017

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...Shrabani Basu has done solid homework in her researching of a dramatic era when Britain was at the peak of its power.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 23 2017

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Davidson’s enthusiasm and her examples should inspire creativity from a lot more college teachers. And in fact there is a lot of good teaching in American higher education. But the puzzle left by Davidson’s book is why the overall model has been so impervious to change.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 23 2017

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...this searing memoir by former Los Angeles Times book critic and fiction and travel writer Michael Frank is a white-hot snapshot of being seduced then brutalized by arrogance, entitlement and manipulation.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 22 2017

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"In A Lonely Place" is a gripping story, but Hughes was too talented, ambitious and grounded to play it merely for suspense.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 22 2017

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“Sulfur Springs” is a blistering Wild West mystery about the “weight of history” and how an unforgiving landscape can create ruthless people.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 21 2017

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So if you can forgive and accept the limitations of the narrative voice, you can find storytelling virtues in this book. Tomos never feels entirely convincing, but there’s plenty to make him sympathetic.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 21 2017

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It reads as a companionable romp through all the stories you sometimes tire of reading to your own children. But like “The Runaway Bunny,” it’s really a gently obsessive tale, a man gathering up so many words and ideas as if to create a magical stay against his own children growing up.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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There’s really nothing sweet or saccharine about Piggy and therein lies his charm; a modern animal hero with plenty of bite.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 20 2017

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Pamuk describes the silent quality of memory. This book sings with the power of diverse remembrance.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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Long Soldier’s emphasis on typography doesn’t mean she ignores prosody. She describes her newborn daughter’s eyes as “untied from northern poles from/ hard unseen winter months.” Her moving poems about motherhood are not anomalies in this deeply political text.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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If the ensuing adventure relies a little too heavily on coincidence and conveniently dropped morsels of information, the resulting escapade is worth it, for Bea and for the reader.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 25 2017

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“The Late Show” is a well-written, fast-paced, compelling and interesting crime thriller. I miss Harry Bosch, but I enjoyed meeting Renee Ballard.

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 24 2017

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...most of all Mr White’s book should be read—not just because it has so much to say about the latter part of the 19th century, but also because it casts light on America’s current problems with giant companies and roiling populism.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 24 2017

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I’m doubtful too whether Morton’s ardent book is sufficient to the moment in which any communism is outsmarted (maybe that should be outstupided) by Trump’s neoliberalism.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 23 2017

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At long last the moment arrives when we learn the effort and lessons have not been for naught with translations from one language to another. I learned lots too and have a fun time reading about it.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 22 2017

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The novel also travels into the hearts of the people who inhabit this city (“the unending city of sores and scars and needs that will never be sated”) – in a moving chronicle of mortality, “the stain of a life slipping away” and the pain of losing loved ones.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 22 2017

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This search for purpose and connection amid chaos and loss permeates even the most heart-wrenching moments of The Futilitarians — and it's what turns the book from a meditation on reading to a celebration of being.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 22 2017

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Noah is by far the most interesting character. The others feel too one-dimensional. Even the mysterious and beautiful Dr. Ava London, who lives in a three-story Beacon Hill home she shouldn’t be able to afford and maintains multiple social media profiles, never reaches the level of complexity she should.

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 21 2017

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I still liked Sarah and Chris and think they’re great for each other but part of that comes from seeing them carry on into the next book. This novella feels a little rushed.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 21 2017

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The study of military history on today’s politically correct campuses ranks somewhat below Latin. What better way for faculty, students and general readers to rediscover the Civil War than through these enthralling books...

Washington Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 20 2017

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Indeed it feels like only one conceivable future, and not the worst imaginable: It’s a better organized, more utopian and also more totalitarian society than any we have yet created.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 26 2017

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