Week of 10 Sep 2017
Y is for... (A Kinsey Millhone Novel)

No Critic Review

Y is for...

by Sue Grafton

The Store

No Critic Review

The Store

by James Patterson

Before We Were Yours: A Novel
Wingate sheds light on a shameful true story of child exploitation but is less successful in engaging readers in her fictional characters' lives.
Kirkus

Before We Were Yours

by Lisa Wingate

The Woman in Cabin 10
Despite this successful formula, and a whole lot of slowly unraveling tension, the end is somehow unsatisfying. And the newspaper and social media inserts add little depth.
Kirkus


The Woman in Cabin 10

by Ruth Ware

The Late Show
More perhaps than any of Connelly’s much-honored other titles, this one reveals why his procedurals are the most soulful in the business: because he finds the soul in the smallest details, faithfully executed.
Kirkus

The Late Show

by Michael Connelly

Drunk Dial

No Critic Review

Drunk Dial

by Penelope Ward

A Game Of Thrones
A vast, rich saga, with splendid characters and an intricate plot flawlessly articulated against a backdrop of real depth and texture.
Kirkus

A Game Of Thrones

by George R. R. Martin

It
Maybe it's finally time to revisit this old haunt, to reassure myself that It is still as sleek, scary and rambunctiously entertaining as I remember.
Guardian


It

by Stephen King

Seeing Red

No Critic Review

Seeing Red

by Sandra Brown

The Whistler
Yes, it’s formula. Yes, it’s not as gritty an exercise in swamp mayhem as Hiaasen, Buchanan, or Crews might turn in. But, like eating a junk burger, even though you probably shouldn’t, it’s plenty satisfying.
Kirkus


The Whistler

by John Grisham

You Say It First: A Small-Town Wedding Romance (Happily Inc)

No Critic Review

You Say It First

by Susan Mallery

The Duchess Deal: Girl Meets Duke

No Critic Review

The Duchess Deal

by Tessa Dare

Camino Island: A Novel
How all these little threads join up is a pleasure for Grisham fans to behold: there’s nothing particularly surprising about it, but he’s a skillful spinner of mayhem and payback.
Kirkus


Camino Island

by John Grisham

milk and honey
This book is perfect for getting you through any breakup. Some poems hit you with the power of two lines, while others need two pages to sink in.
http://www.dailyuw.com

milk and honey

by rupi kaur

THE HANDMAID'S TALE
Atwood, to her credit, creates a chillingly specific, imaginable night-mare. The book is short on characterization--this is Atwood, never a warm writer, at her steeliest--and long on cynicism--it's got none of the human credibility of a work such as Walker Percy's Love In The Ruins. But the scariness is visceral...
Kirkus

THE HANDMAID'S TALE

by Margaret Atwood