Week of 05 Nov 2017
Leonardo da Vinci
Isaacson doesn’t claim to make any fresh discoveries, but his book is intelligently organised, simply written and beautifully illustrated, and it ends with a kind of mental gymnastics programme that suggests how we can learn from Leonardo...
Guardian

Leonardo da Vinci

by Walter Isaacson

Grant
Chernow’s gracefully written biography, which promises to be the definitive work on Grant for years to come, is fully equal to the man’s remarkable story.
Star Tribune

Grant

by Ron Chernow

Endurance: A Year in Space, A Lifetime of Discovery

No Critic Review

Endurance

by Scott Kelly

The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President
As with most anti-Trump books, this one will shore up the opinions of those already convinced of his lack of fitness for the job but won’t change the minds of his supporters, the vast majority of whom won’t read it.
Kirkus

The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump

by Bandy X. Lee

Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything
Soonish makes The Matrix seem surprisingly plausible, Keanu Reeves aside. But it leaves plenty of room for all sorts of outcomes. Part of the benefit of the book is that it doesn't promise we'll all be sipping printed cocktails on the moon in 2067. The Weinersmiths just lay out, clearly and with a wry sense of humor...
NPR

NPR

Soonish

by Kelly Weinersmith

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry
In short order, you’ll be conversant in mind-bending trivia about “star stuff” that may fundamentally shift your perspective of our place in the universe—and convince you to pursue some of the many fine longer-form books on the subject.
Kirkus

Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

by Neil deGrasse Tyson

The Autobiography of Gucci Mane

No Critic Review

The Autobiography of Gucci Mane

by Gucci Mane

Where the Past Begins: A Writer's Memoir
Where the Past Begins ends with hummingbirds flying past Tan’s office window, a reminder that she, too, is the author of a wonderful birdsong. This book is a gift that feeds those who wish to sing and long to write.
NY Journal of Books


Where the Past Begins

by Amy Tan

Killing England: The Brutal Struggle for American Independence (Bill O'Reilly's Killing Series)
In an age of the deconstruction of history and the portrayal of biblical Christianity as detrimental to modern America, this book offers some sanity in preserving the history of the American Revolution. For non-historians like myself, it is a good read.
The Aquila Report

Killing England

by Bill O'Reilly

What Happened
After reading the book, a question arises as to whether those who trashed it actually read the book . . . or did they only read some of it? That is a mistake.
NY Journal of Books


What Happened

by Hillary Rodham Clinton

We're Going to Need More Wine: Stories That Are Funny, Complicated, and True

No Critic Review

We're Going to Need More Wine

by Gabrielle Union

We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy
Although Coates subtitles the book “An American Tragedy,” he allows a ray of hope for “a resistance intolerant of self-exoneration, set against blinding itself to evil.” Emotionally charged, deftly crafted, and urgently relevant essays.
Kirkus

We Were Eight Years in Power

by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
An unusually timely and deeply affecting view of a social class whose health and economic problems are making headlines in this election year.
Kirkus


Hillbilly Elegy

by J. D. Vance

Same Kind of Different As Me: A Modern-Day Slave, an International Art Dealer, and the Unlikely Woman Who Bound Them Together
A beautiful story that warms and wrenches the heart; you’ll want tissues on hand for this one.
Blog Critics

Same Kind of Different As Me

by Ron Hall

The Glass Castle
Walls’s journalistic bare-bones style makes for a chilling, wrenching, incredible testimony of childhood neglect. A pull-yourself-up-by-the-bootstraps, thoroughly American story
Kirkus


The Glass Castle

by Jeannette Walls