The Scott twins may not be great writers, but they are an example of a very real phenomenon: guys who are born lucky...where you get the feeling something was always going to break well for them, in part because of all those advantages, but also because they were going to keep trying things until it did.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Sep 15 2017

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A Legacy of Spies brings it all back, as fresh and as rancid as ever, in a tale that shows the master in the full vigour of his old mastery.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 07 2017

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This is a story that gallops to the finish with a surprise on every other page and I just gave myself to watching the forces for Good battle the forces of Evil as the plot wound tighter and tighter...

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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...this is less a righteous manifesto for the modern man than a highly personal story that might just resonate with others and give them confidence to talk, too.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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Bowden revisits the historic battle with the same character-driven, grunt-level reporting style that made “Black Hawk Down” a bestseller. He lends a sympathetic ear to surviving soldiers on both sides...

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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Yet, revealing as the book is about Mr Gorbachev’s ability to overcome ideological dogmas that required squaring up to the West, it is equally revealing about how Western leaders were unable or unwilling to believe him.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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The information was interesting but I didn’t learn much that I didn’t already know...As a wide ranging skim across the era, it’s a starting place but not really more than that.

Dear Author

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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This is Louise Penny’s most complex and bloody concoction, especially in the location of the lovely village which is Gamache’s home.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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...despite a few pious throat-clearings on the dust jacket to the contrary, he has no interest in balance, no desire to be nice about the man whom he blames for pretty much everything that went wrong in the 20th century, from totalitarianism to the decline of organised religion.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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This is not, as the book’s subtitle suggests the unwomanly face of war. It is the face of war faced by women, just as so many American woman soldiers face in our 17-year-old battles in faraway places today. This book holds uncomfortable truths up for all to see.

Washington Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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Mr Knausgaard knowingly breaks the frames of taste and tact. His art of transgression satisfies the “longing for authenticity”; the urge “to go beyond the boundaries”.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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Rushdie has always been an impish myth-manipulator, refusing to accept, as in this novel, that the lives of the emperors can’t be blended with film noir, popular culture and crime caper. On the evidence of The Golden House, he is quite right.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 28 2017

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It is hard to imagine a more insightful account of mass grief and its terrible processes. This book is a future classic of disaster journalism, up there with John Hersey’s Hiroshima.

Guardian

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Aug 27 2017

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Lagercrantz has all the elements of the Millennium series at his disposal, but the adrenaline is missing: it feels as if one has gone to a restaurant, ordered a rare steak and been served soggy fish fingers instead.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Sep 13 2017

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In prose as lush as the verdant California coastline on which he has set his novel, and which he clearly knows in intimate detail, Gabriel Tallent reveals the hard reality of life for Turtle Alveston.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Sep 05 2017

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Traditionally, as with a good musician, the mark of a good novelist is the illusion of effortlessness. Lynch doesn’t do effortless...Yet Lynch’s lush, poetic prose deliberately and painfully acts as a foil to the reality of the famine.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Sep 01 2017

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...The Burning Girl is instead a subversive commentary on the stories we tell about women and the ways those stories circumscribe our lives.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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All of this makes for a witty, sneakily feminist kind of crime story. At one point Marion contemplates her lack of a moral compass, her inability to feel guilt, and laments that it has not taken her farther in life.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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...Kraus reconstitutes Acker’s wanderings with real wit and beauty, understanding without pandering to the painfully high stakes of her identity games.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 31 2017

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When Anne and Flannery finally meet, the novel kicks into gear. The sexual energy crests, but more rewarding is some sense of the Flannery of old returning: audacious, confident, smart, seductive. Then “Pages for Her” ends, almost abruptly, as if Brownrigg knows these are characters whose story still has places to go.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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True to Velázquez and his heirs, Olivares and García know that each of those flickering glimpses shows a different side of the truth. Their mirror has flaws, but it still catches plenty of light.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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Many books these days have high stakes and high angst (that’s not a complaint; I like those books as well) but Need You Now is much more understated. I expect readers who are looking for a romantic literary escape without too much drama will appreciate this one the most.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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The overall message remains important and it is generally conveyed with skill and emotional force. But I have reservations.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Aug 29 2017

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Nothing in “I’ll Have What She’s Having” makes a persuasive case for why “Sleepless” and “Mail” can be considered in the same category of excellence as “Harry/Sally”...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 30 2017

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And now we have Sen. Flake’s effort, bearing the same title and leaving many people genuinely puzzled as to how he’s able to take the title of an existing work and make it his own. No doubt there was a special arrangement with the Goldwater Institute, where he once worked. But that’s not made clear.

Washington Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 27 2017

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Weiss steadily builds the tension to an ending you knew was coming — and, let's be honest, probably hoped for — yet it still arrives as a sudden, powerful shock. It's a shock that lingers...

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Aug 27 2017

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