It feels strange to criticize heavy-metal culture on the same grounds that organizations such as the Parents Music Resource Centre attacked it in its heyday. But, while those objections framed musicians as agents of a Satanic fringe, in retrospect, eighties metal looks more like the garish id of consumer capitalism...

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 27 2018

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The story is as bleak as anything Johnson has written, but his portrayal of Cass feels almost unbearably true. Johnson treats Cass with compassion, but never patronizes him...

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 20 2018

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Perhaps when Nadia and Saeed passed through the portals, they passed into a new reality they created. Isn’t that, ultimately, what nations and individuals do, from day to day and moment to moment? This was a novel that made me think, and feel, and appreciate what I have.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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Despite this engaging mixture of science and culture, at times, the book has little forward momentum and relies too heavily on the relationship between Narayan and Sarala as its narrative spine.

Star Tribune

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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The authors have done a commendable job of returning to his rightful place the man who inflated the reputation of art and artists so successfully that he himself was squeezed out of the picture.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 18 2018

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Heartland is an imperfect, yet pleasing cocktail that goes down unexpectedly smooth; it is truly unlike any novel I can think of, or imagine.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 18 2018

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Inspiration is a rare and unexpected gift in a book filled with the fluff of Hollywood, but Benjamin provides it with The Girls in the Picture.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 17 2018

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We get to see how the action/adventure plot makes our narrator (Murderbot) not grow up exactly, because its not a child, but I guess figure out something more that it wants from life, and I thought it was a lot of fun and look forward to the next adventure.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 16 2018

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...the frail writer encouraged her daughter to write her biography. To write about her mother — and to explain a writer who disdained analysis — Phipps would have to depict “the small world which Keane inhabited and loved and hated to the bone.” In this engaging if uneven biography, Phipps does so with compassion and restraint...

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 16 2018

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Carey has found a way to delve deeply into a topic that was previously morally unavailable, so that what starts out feeling like a typical, jauntily whimsical Peter-Carey-by-numbers soon becomes something more complex and powerful.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 15 2018

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...she contrasts with the appalling new era of flip-flops and beach cover-ups. But she hits her serious themes even harder, and This Could Hurt is far more tender than caustic.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 14 2018

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To say anything more than that would blow Yates's closing....packs a slow-burn punch when all the threads of narrative and back-story start pulling together.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 13 2018

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A book that begins in homage remains then a bit narrow when set against its model. But it’s a mark of Neel Mukherjee’s range and force and ambition that any lesser comparison would seem an injustice.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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Throughout this important and meticulous biography, Fraser allows Wilder’s thoughts and actions to speak for themselves, never indulging in unnecessary interpretation.

Financial Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 23 2018

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To read Being Ecological is to be caught up in a brilliant display of intellectual pyrotechnics. The playful seriousness of Morton’s prose mixes references to Blade Runner and Tibetan Buddhism with lyrics from Talking Heads and concepts from German philosophers.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 20 2018

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Foenkinos writes arrestingly about Charlotte, masterfully imagining her interior life as well as charting his responses as he follows her to places “charged with terror”.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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Such are Thien’s gifts that she can write lyrically about horror without stripping it of force. When bombs fall on Phnom Penh, Janie registers her brother’s screaming as “a wide emptiness, a pressure in the air blinding me, and in the darkness I hear a strange, familiar ticking — insects, the typewriter, a clock counting time.”

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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As I read “Winter” I wondered whether its author had grown bored by his facility with very long prose; whether he wished to elude being pigeonholed as a certain type of writer...perhaps I should be less judgmental of an artist who tries new things and works against his natural style.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 18 2018

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Brit(ish) is the work of a confident social guide all too used to “collecting examples of blatant racism in the mainstream press”. Only rarely does her compass go awry.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 18 2018

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Imogen Hermes Gowar delights in the feminine fakery of mermaids, but as a writer she is the real deal.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 17 2018

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This book is an essential read for anyone who has ever moaned about their taxes going to pay for disability services: it should be legally required reading for anyone in the medical profession or anyone with the power to decide about cuts to those services.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 16 2018

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Moments like these — rendered subtly, without poster-size messaging — are when “Green” is at its most prickly and compelling.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 15 2018

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Wolff deplores Trump, explains the conditions that made him possible, and accuses us all of colluding in this madness.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 14 2018

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Although Blood on the Page raises important issues, it is hobbled by trying to fit an inquiry into government’s possible misuse of the judiciary into the template of a true-crime narrative. It’s fine as far as it goes, but there is a more important, if less commercial, book trying to get out.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jan 13 2018

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Barring the odd stylistic infelicity, he handles his material well. A Viennese physicist himself, he is as comfortable with local detail as he is with the grand picture.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jan 13 2018

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The Stowaway” is a charming book, a glimpse of history that, by definition, fascinates and delights.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jan 19 2018

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