Sometimes, as he says, “there is no room for truth”; what’s needed is wisdom and compassion. They are the qualities that shine through this little book. But there’s a fair bit of truth-telling, too.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 17 2018

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As in The Dry, Harper deploys end-of-chapter hooks and narrative misdirections with aplomb. But with a style that is efficient at best (people never smile: instead, their mouths always “lift at the corners”), Force of Nature begs for an internal dynamism.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 10 2018

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“The Friend” could almost carry a trigger warning for writers, teachers and readers, except that Nunez’s prose itself comforts us. Her confident and direct style uplifts — the music in her sentences, her deep and varied intelligence.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 09 2018

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You don’t have to have any particular interest in Down’s syndrome to connect with this aspect of the book: it isn’t a polemic about special needs, but a detailed and moving portrayal of a kind of radical innocence, one that brings both the cruelty and the kindness in the world around it into sharp focus.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 14 2018

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They will remember their losses but they will end up not allowing that to destroy the future. The ending isn’t all sugar-coated as there is a villain to be taken down and dealt with but this is a satisfying end to a generally strong series.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 09 2018

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Bagieu’s pen transforms these true stories into something that has the tone of a personalized fairy tale. And in the end, this turns out to be just perfect.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 20 2018

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Taken together, these two long poems, as well as two odes to nature that follow them, represent a powerful act of keening for a falling world. Hillman is the kind of moral writer, like Jorie Graham, whose new books are best read as installments in an unfolding act of lifelong witness and engagement.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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In fact as one of my book buddies said, the real strong love connection that we get to *see* was between Isaac and Amalie and do not get me wrong, I enjoyed that relationship, but I wanted much more than I got out of Isaac/Jack relationship. I also thought that the ending was very rushed and the line editing could have been stronger.

Dear Author

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 07 2018

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A writer cannot be judged for his project, only its execution. Uzodinma Iweala is a fine and confident novelist. Genre is a useful thing when organizing texts in a bookshop, but immaterial to the particular exchange between writer and reader.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 15 2018

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Strangely, though, the most enjoyable bit in the book isn’t on love or trouble, well-trodden themes in recent publishing (see Ariel Levy, Elizabeth Gilbert), it’s about pomegranates. I’d read a Dederer memoir on pomegranates.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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With this as its subtext, “The Sandman” sends us off to dreamland with a nightmare that can make us happy.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 13 2018

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Free Woman is worth reading as a piece of complicated thought, and one that's funny and sexy and frank, to boot. And if you haven't read The Golden Notebook, don't worry. I promise, you'll go buy a copy the moment you're done.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on May 10 2018

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There’s so much to praise and parse here that I hardly know where to begin. How about the way that the light visual comedy of the bread is juxtaposed with the cerebral, astringent humor...

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Apr 10 2018

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But he doesn’t merely replace one imposed narrative with another. Instead, he provokes a far-reaching and unresolved conversation about what freedom might really mean. A reader yearning for an all-explaining style of storytelling will be frustrated. Maybe that, too, is a kind of nostalgia for tyranny.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on May 03 2018

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The narrative empowers without preaching, weaving its message deftly into a rip-roaring tale...But as I reached the last few pages of this book, I got a thrill. I thought to myself, is this where it's going? I hoped it was — and my hope was rewarded.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 10 2018

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Anger and sorrow are one pair of emotions that keeps surfacing throughout “The House of Broken Angels.” So do love and pain, joy and resentment, hatred and reconciliation, backstabbing and tenderness. All complicated, all compelling...

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 26 2018

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This is a profoundly generous and good-hearted book, one that leaves you missing its characters as you would fondly remembered friends. Hensher is one of our most gifted novelists and this is certainly his best novel yet.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 19 2018

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But Rosie isn’t just a prop, and though she doesn’t get pregnant she’s generative in other ways. Maybe this isn’t a memoir, but a wild riff on authorship, especially the vexed business of how to get the world on to the page still wet.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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Much of what’s great in this book falls into spoiler territory, and that spoilery stuff more than makes up for the issues I had. So I will just say this—if you are a fan of this series, read this book! You will not regret it.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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Bergman’s style tends to the sensational but that does not mask a critical strand that questions the morality and effectiveness of Israel’s approach to dealing with the enemy in its own backyard.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 22 2018

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The Woman's Hour demonstrates whys and hows of that epochal transition. Every election is woman's hour now.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 06 2018

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I like that the book didn’t end with hugs and feels since that makes Murderbot deeply uncomfortable. What will Murderbot do next now that it’s been freed from being a Company drone? I have no idea but I’m definitely waiting eagerly for part two in the Murderbot Diaries.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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Hearth's book expertly gives young readers wider context for Jennings' story. She paints a picture of a much smaller New York, and notes in one of the book's numerous sidebars that slavery was practiced in the North as well as the South...

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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Mounk is a clear and often forceful writer, if not an especially stylish one; he favors the step-by-step explication and the tidy formulation. His prose seems to reflect his preferred mode of politics: earnest, respectful and pragmatic.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 14 2018

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Still, to be financially responsible is a worthy goal, and dialing back the consumerism is pretty much always a good idea. For starters, there’s no need to buy this book — save that $22.99! You can borrow it for free from the library. (Thames recommends that very thing on page 100.)

Star Tribune

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2018

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It is at the end of the book that I became most unhappy. He claims that there was a steady improvement in living standards after Watt invented the steam engine in 1763, brushing aside a century and a half of serious inquiry, much of which argues the opposite.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 02 2018

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