Her dogged reporting makes “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark” both hard to read and hard to put down. The accounts from survivors are nightmarish and the crime scenes of the homicide victims are disturbing.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 23 2018

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In this revision alone, this damning but achingly tender novel holds open a space for human redemption, never mind that we have built our systems against it.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 09 2018

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They will remember their losses but they will end up not allowing that to destroy the future. The ending isn’t all sugar-coated as there is a villain to be taken down and dealt with but this is a satisfying end to a generally strong series.

Dear Author

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 09 2018

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But Rosie isn’t just a prop, and though she doesn’t get pregnant she’s generative in other ways. Maybe this isn’t a memoir, but a wild riff on authorship, especially the vexed business of how to get the world on to the page still wet.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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Bagieu’s pen transforms these true stories into something that has the tone of a personalized fairy tale. And in the end, this turns out to be just perfect.

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 20 2018

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Yet the biggest thing (almost) left out of Bergman’s book is that targeted killing offers no end to the terrorism. Targeted killings are a tactic, not a strategy.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 07 2018

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In fact as one of my book buddies said, the real strong love connection that we get to *see* was between Isaac and Amalie and do not get me wrong, I enjoyed that relationship, but I wanted much more than I got out of Isaac/Jack relationship. I also thought that the ending was very rushed and the line editing could have been stronger.

Dear Author

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 07 2018

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I like that the book didn’t end with hugs and feels since that makes Murderbot deeply uncomfortable. What will Murderbot do next now that it’s been freed from being a Company drone? I have no idea but I’m definitely waiting eagerly for part two in the Murderbot Diaries.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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Strangely, though, the most enjoyable bit in the book isn’t on love or trouble, well-trodden themes in recent publishing (see Ariel Levy, Elizabeth Gilbert), it’s about pomegranates. I’d read a Dederer memoir on pomegranates.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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By this point the book’s greatest tension comes from wondering whether either Joona or Saga is any match for this near-supernatural monster, who can implant thoughts in his victims’ heads or turn up as an apparition just staring into their windows. Scared yet? You will be.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 04 2018

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"Cloudbursts," the author's wonderful, essential new collection, largely showcases his later, recondite style, which he has perfected in his short stories, producing some three dozen since 2003.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 02 2018

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As this shimmering, meandering, frequently beautiful but somewhat elusive book reveals, he, too, is an amalgam of several people: acclaimed literary novelist, popular crime writer, idiosyncratic travel guide, private person, and rather reticent memoirist.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 27 2018

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Neither an after-school special nor gratuitous suicide porn, the survivors' grappling incomprehension, self-blame and blind stabs at an elusive empathy are clear-eyed and delicately evoked. Frustratingly, the long-awaited revelation never arrives, and even the denouement is undone by a bewildering shock-comedy finale.

LA Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Feb 16 2018

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“The Friend” could almost carry a trigger warning for writers, teachers and readers, except that Nunez’s prose itself comforts us. Her confident and direct style uplifts — the music in her sentences, her deep and varied intelligence.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 09 2018

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Anger and sorrow are one pair of emotions that keeps surfacing throughout “The House of Broken Angels.” So do love and pain, joy and resentment, hatred and reconciliation, backstabbing and tenderness. All complicated, all compelling...

NY Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 26 2018

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This is a profoundly generous and good-hearted book, one that leaves you missing its characters as you would fondly remembered friends. Hensher is one of our most gifted novelists and this is certainly his best novel yet.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 19 2018

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Much of what’s great in this book falls into spoiler territory, and that spoilery stuff more than makes up for the issues I had. So I will just say this—if you are a fan of this series, read this book! You will not regret it.

Dear Author

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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Taken together, these two long poems, as well as two odes to nature that follow them, represent a powerful act of keening for a falling world. Hillman is the kind of moral writer, like Jorie Graham, whose new books are best read as installments in an unfolding act of lifelong witness and engagement.

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 08 2018

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The narrative empowers without preaching, weaving its message deftly into a rip-roaring tale...But as I reached the last few pages of this book, I got a thrill. I thought to myself, is this where it's going? I hoped it was — and my hope was rewarded.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 10 2018

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The Woman's Hour demonstrates whys and hows of that epochal transition. Every election is woman's hour now.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 06 2018

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Hearth's book expertly gives young readers wider context for Jennings' story. She paints a picture of a much smaller New York, and notes in one of the book's numerous sidebars that slavery was practiced in the North as well as the South...

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Mar 05 2018

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A writer cannot be judged for his project, only its execution. Uzodinma Iweala is a fine and confident novelist. Genre is a useful thing when organizing texts in a bookshop, but immaterial to the particular exchange between writer and reader.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Mar 15 2018

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Still, to be financially responsible is a worthy goal, and dialing back the consumerism is pretty much always a good idea. For starters, there’s no need to buy this book — save that $22.99! You can borrow it for free from the library. (Thames recommends that very thing on page 100.)

Star Tribune

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Mar 03 2018

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An irony skilfully evaded by Pinker is that there are whole (coherent) systems of thought that make the same claims against the Enlightenment.

Globe and Mail

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Feb 28 2018

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In the end she seems to accept that in order to be her own person, she must break with her family. But the rawness of this last section suggests that despite her amazing transformation and this powerful book, Westover’s remarkable education is not yet complete.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Feb 23 2018

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...his book is the work of an enterprising journalist who has interviewed many in the cast of hippie farmers, cooks, communards and food artisans who together forged what Kauffman asks us to regard as a new and “unique, self-contained cuisine.”

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Feb 14 2018

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