But despite the blunders, missteps and excessive plot twists of “Welcome to Lagos,” its dialogue rings true.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Aug 02 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

That is one of several noble notions in this book. Everyone who still believes we can rescue the republic should embrace all of them. “Hope really is a choice,” says the author, “and a practical habit.”

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 29 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

My other beef is that the descriptions of bike-racing, where Reed strives for transcendence, are filled with false notes that will jar true cycling fans among his readers.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

Looking for truth in the courtroom sense in Sedaris’s essays has always been a mug’s game, missing the point. Truthfulness, though – emotional, spiritual – he’s always traded on these. And with Calypso, he’s given us his most truthful work yet.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 26 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

"Give Me Your Hand" is a nuanced and atmospheric story about the lure of big dreams, especially for women. It's also a story about the unpredictable power of dreams to suddenly turn into dead ends.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 24 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

Dongala has written an unrelentingly bleak story, occasionally lightened by Mad Dog's laughable pronouncements, and he grabs us from the start with a language that is rude and raw (Mad Dog's) and lyrical (Laokolé's) in Maria Louise Ascher's translation from the author's French.

NY Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 24 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

Bergman’s style tends to the sensational but that does not mask a critical strand that questions the morality and effectiveness of Israel’s approach to dealing with the enemy in its own backyard.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 22 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Jen’s relationships with her elder daughter and her own mother get less page time in “Whistle,” but they are equally credible. In fact, the only underdrawn character is Jen’s husband/Lana’s dad. He does have a name, but it’s barely worth recalling...

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 20 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

The plot? Not this novel’s particular strength. Although the setups are plausible and gripping, characters make too many credulity-straining choices that are explicable only in the contrived service of heightening drama...Still, Karjel offers ample pleasures along the way.

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 19 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

There There itself is a kind of dance. Even in its tragic details, it is lyrical and playful, shaking and shimmering with energy. The novel dips into the tiniest personal details and sweeps across history.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 18 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Similar, too, is a generalizing tendency, where Fox’s historical knowledge skates on thin ice...These are small matters, however, against a bigger picture of a world on the cusp of modernity...

NY Times

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 17 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NY Times

If you are not of the scientifically-minded supernerd persuasion, this might very well be the book for you. There are definitely jumping-off points for discussions on women in STEM, ethics in science, and proper scientific procedures. The formula looked good — but I wish the book hadn't felt so formulaic in its execution.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 15 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

No Way But This is an unusual biography; it is written with deep admiration for its subject and with perhaps a little too much indulgence. But then, Robeson was the kind of urbane, politically engaged celebrity that we rarely find in our age of millionaire poseurs such as Kanye West and Jay-Z...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 14 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

This book makes a sound, and it should be a loud one. It is not for the faint-hearted, but they should read it anyway. We should all read it, if only to bear witness to an atrocity that happened on our watch, and that we cannot simply sweep away as concerning a faraway people of whose faith we know little.

Guardian

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 31 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

This tight novel, made up of 10 parts and 65 compact chapters, employs a non-linear narrative, moving between England in 1936 and the Dominican childhood of Gwendolen, his protagonist, with forays into the intervening years. There is no shortage of biographical material on Rhys.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Kwon could have picked up the pace in some of her sections. Otherwise it is difficult to fault this powerful debut, which explores complex issues in a remarkably assured way.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

Spiced with foreshadowings, packed with big issues from Aids to the rise of the far right, and tempered by strategic reticence, this novel compels the reader’s attention as consistently as it entertains.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 25 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

The episode, as unnerving as it is intriguing, dissolves, barely resolved and only semi-explained. And maybe that’s Tyler’s point. But I finished this novel wishing I could take her back to that wonderfully unsettling earlier moment and beg her to make Willa scream and then see what happened next.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 24 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Hermione Hoby captures it all in her debut novel, Neon in Daylight, a smart, shimmering study of youthful self-discovery and the power of place, unfurling over the course of a single summer in the city.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 23 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

But here in this new collection of stories I’m having a problem. It feels as if it’s to do with liking the characters, but perhaps it’s just that the rhythm of the writing has lost its elasticity somewhere.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 21 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

In filling in the details of Nur Jahan’s life, Ms Lal has not only written a revisionist feminist biography; she has also provided a vivid picture of the Mughal court, with its luxuries, beauties, intrigues and horrors.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 19 2018

Read Full Review | See more by The Economist

Caroline’s Bikini is the long-winded story of Emily loving Evan loving Caroline – and although it might seem unlikely, given the convolutions of the writing, it turns out to be a really superb, very readable novel. I suppose I am, you know, hopelessly in love with it.

Guardian

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 19 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Brilliantly constructed, “The Shades” is ghostly and alive, cerebral and sensuous, an absolutely riveting read.

LA Times

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 18 2018

Read Full Review | See more by LA Times

In the end, one wonders what connects the disparate narratives in these chapters, bar vague reflections on the haiku of the desert – biological and social. But it’s an entertaining volume.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 15 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

It was the illusion of permanence, of the one stable self. But The Cost of Living is the story of an exchange, not a loss. Levy gives up her calm family home, and in return, she gets all the frantic outdoor transit of the world. She becomes a woman with leaves in her hair, a woman who is, as her neighbor puts it, busy busy busy.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 14 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

What remains problematic, however, is Satia’s attempt to relate her rich material to the British industrial revolution. Whenever and wherever it occurs, industrialisation amounts to a total reworking of the way in which societies provide for their people, transforming economic activity, but also social and political life, and the environment.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 13 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian