Jen’s relationships with her elder daughter and her own mother get less page time in “Whistle,” but they are equally credible. In fact, the only underdrawn character is Jen’s husband/Lana’s dad. He does have a name, but it’s barely worth recalling...

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 20 2018

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Caroline’s Bikini is the long-winded story of Emily loving Evan loving Caroline – and although it might seem unlikely, given the convolutions of the writing, it turns out to be a really superb, very readable novel. I suppose I am, you know, hopelessly in love with it.

Guardian

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 19 2018

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Brilliantly constructed, “The Shades” is ghostly and alive, cerebral and sensuous, an absolutely riveting read.

LA Times

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 18 2018

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In the end, one wonders what connects the disparate narratives in these chapters, bar vague reflections on the haiku of the desert – biological and social. But it’s an entertaining volume.

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 15 2018

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It was the illusion of permanence, of the one stable self. But The Cost of Living is the story of an exchange, not a loss. Levy gives up her calm family home, and in return, she gets all the frantic outdoor transit of the world. She becomes a woman with leaves in her hair, a woman who is, as her neighbor puts it, busy busy busy.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 14 2018

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What remains problematic, however, is Satia’s attempt to relate her rich material to the British industrial revolution. Whenever and wherever it occurs, industrialisation amounts to a total reworking of the way in which societies provide for their people, transforming economic activity, but also social and political life, and the environment.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 13 2018

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Moshfegh’s strange and captivating novel suggests that sleep may be the only thing we humans have for recharging our souls and reawakening our sensibilities in the discovery and creation of beauty.

LA Times

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 12 2018

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What drives the novel are Tyler’s wonderfully direct and evocative character sketches and dialogue that flows with grace and humor, deceptive in its simplicity. Like all her books, “Clock Dance” is unfussy but generous.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 11 2018

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The writing will appeal to readers who like their historicals to sound historical, but character's point of view is pleasantly modern...which means less time on ridiculous, manufactured dilemmas and more time getting to happy ever after.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 08 2018

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...there is a grim power to this novel, and to Phillips’s remorseless scrutiny of her poor characters. The Beautiful Bureaucrat is a fascinating and gruelling portrait of extreme capitalism and the degradation of ordinary lives.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 06 2018

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...I wish I could sit down with you over a couple beers and talk about The Cabin. Maybe it would let me sleep better. Because to discuss something like this is to defuse it a little. It takes a bit of the edge off when a collective gathers to say, No, it's okay.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

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It’s more than tweets and soundbites; these pages reveal young leaders as human...In fact, I’m recommending “#NeverAgain” as a conversation starter for book groups or student clubs.

LA Times

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

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Phillips ends a well-intended but mildly unsatisfactory novel by imagining a penitent Gwen weeding her Welsh father’s neglected grave...

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 03 2018

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In filling in the details of Nur Jahan’s life, Ms Lal has not only written a revisionist feminist biography; she has also provided a vivid picture of the Mughal court, with its luxuries, beauties, intrigues and horrors.

The Economist

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 19 2018

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There There itself is a kind of dance. Even in its tragic details, it is lyrical and playful, shaking and shimmering with energy. The novel dips into the tiniest personal details and sweeps across history.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 18 2018

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The best part of this slow-burning novel is that just when you think you've seen the explosion, another one happens — and you definitely won't guess the last, no matter what foreshadowing exists.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 17 2018

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If you are not of the scientifically-minded supernerd persuasion, this might very well be the book for you. There are definitely jumping-off points for discussions on women in STEM, ethics in science, and proper scientific procedures. The formula looked good — but I wish the book hadn't felt so formulaic in its execution.

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jul 15 2018

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No Way But This is an unusual biography; it is written with deep admiration for its subject and with perhaps a little too much indulgence. But then, Robeson was the kind of urbane, politically engaged celebrity that we rarely find in our age of millionaire poseurs such as Kanye West and Jay-Z...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 14 2018

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In Young’s hands the lyric essay transforms into something rich and strange, a sea change of form. “Can You Tolerate This?” is an assured debut from a prodigiously talented, empathic writer whose prose shines as brightly as her poetry.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 13 2018

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Poirier is more infectious in her enthusiasms than Bakewell, though – so much so that when grumpy Saul Bellow arrives in town as everyone else is partying like it’s 1949, it’s hard not to share her exasperation.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 11 2018

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Admittedly, there are moments where The Paper Lovers teeters close to chronicling the self-inflicted first-world problems of the middle classes. But the way in which Woodward navigates these choppy waters is engrossing, if not always evenly handled.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 08 2018

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There have been some excellent footslog memoirs in recent years, including Nick Hunt’s Walking the Woods and the Water, and Where the Wild Winds Are, but none describing as marathon a trek as Stagg’s. He’s engagingly honest about the boredom he feels in transit and on overnight stops...

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 07 2018

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Despite its treatment of sexual exploitation, How To Be Famous is not dark — it is a joyous, yelping novel about learning to love things without apology or irony. In service to this, metaphors careen all over the book like untrained animals, shedding and slobbering on the carpets. Nuance is lost, repetition is constant...

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 05 2018

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What a fine ear Markovits has for the way people talk. His dialogue put me in mind of David Mamet’s remark that modern US drama is mainly about people not talking to each other. One by one, the Essingers come under fire, but they counter with deft defensive tactics.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

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There are other new books about the El Faro’s sinking...But Slade’s book devotes the most time to the Coast Guard inquiry, and this sets “Into the Raging Sea” apart.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 03 2018

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White’s book is a collection of essays, each connecting the seemingly thousands of books he has read – I find it impossible to imagine anyone better read than White, though with typical modesty he insists he knows lots of people who are...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 02 2018

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