No Way But This is an unusual biography; it is written with deep admiration for its subject and with perhaps a little too much indulgence. But then, Robeson was the kind of urbane, politically engaged celebrity that we rarely find in our age of millionaire poseurs such as Kanye West and Jay-Z...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 14 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

In Young’s hands the lyric essay transforms into something rich and strange, a sea change of form. “Can You Tolerate This?” is an assured debut from a prodigiously talented, empathic writer whose prose shines as brightly as her poetry.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 13 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

Poirier is more infectious in her enthusiasms than Bakewell, though – so much so that when grumpy Saul Bellow arrives in town as everyone else is partying like it’s 1949, it’s hard not to share her exasperation.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 11 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

The writing will appeal to readers who like their historicals to sound historical, but character's point of view is pleasantly modern...which means less time on ridiculous, manufactured dilemmas and more time getting to happy ever after.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 08 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

...there is a grim power to this novel, and to Phillips’s remorseless scrutiny of her poor characters. The Beautiful Bureaucrat is a fascinating and gruelling portrait of extreme capitalism and the degradation of ordinary lives.

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 06 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

...I wish I could sit down with you over a couple beers and talk about The Cabin. Maybe it would let me sleep better. Because to discuss something like this is to defuse it a little. It takes a bit of the edge off when a collective gathers to say, No, it's okay.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

It’s more than tweets and soundbites; these pages reveal young leaders as human...In fact, I’m recommending “#NeverAgain” as a conversation starter for book groups or student clubs.

LA Times

Rating Excellent

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

Read Full Review | See more by LA Times

White’s book is a collection of essays, each connecting the seemingly thousands of books he has read – I find it impossible to imagine anyone better read than White, though with typical modesty he insists he knows lots of people who are...

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 02 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

When Lynn's past collides with her nightmarish present, it's because of that work, with more than a bit of government intrigue stirred in to good effect. By the time Lynn and Roxy set off for wintry Colorado on the trail of young William, The Darkest Time of Night has become a hugely satisfying, while still mystifying, suspense novel.

NPR

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 01 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

Despite – or perhaps because of – his predictability, Billy Collins remains to middle America what John Betjeman was to postwar England: popular, relatable, nostalgic, gently comic. His appeal in Britain is likely to grow with this latest collection.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 29 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Thompson, like most of us, doesn’t pretend to have the answers. He shares his journey, and the journey of his family, with us in a heartfelt, vulnerable way that will resonate with any parent, but especially the parents of teenage boys.

Star Tribune

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 29 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

Their humanity is nicely balanced against the story's shocking elements. Son of Hitler may have its slow spots, but few war stories are this much fun.

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 28 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

The writing is good but I feel that Sadie’s story deserved more long term attention. In a world that seems to thrust medication at mental health patients in place of discussions and dialog, I wonder at Sadie’s long term benefit from it. I would also have liked for the other characters besides George to be more than cardboard cutouts.

Dear Author

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jun 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Dear Author

What remains problematic, however, is Satia’s attempt to relate her rich material to the British industrial revolution. Whenever and wherever it occurs, industrialisation amounts to a total reworking of the way in which societies provide for their people, transforming economic activity, but also social and political life, and the environment.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 13 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

How far you take to My Year of Rest and Relaxation may depend on how entertaining you find this kind of caustic sociological taxonomy.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 22 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Admittedly, there are moments where The Paper Lovers teeters close to chronicling the self-inflicted first-world problems of the middle classes. But the way in which Woodward navigates these choppy waters is engrossing, if not always evenly handled.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 08 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

There have been some excellent footslog memoirs in recent years, including Nick Hunt’s Walking the Woods and the Water, and Where the Wild Winds Are, but none describing as marathon a trek as Stagg’s. He’s engagingly honest about the boredom he feels in transit and on overnight stops...

Guardian

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 07 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

Despite its treatment of sexual exploitation, How To Be Famous is not dark — it is a joyous, yelping novel about learning to love things without apology or irony. In service to this, metaphors careen all over the book like untrained animals, shedding and slobbering on the carpets. Nuance is lost, repetition is constant...

NPR

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 05 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR

What a fine ear Markovits has for the way people talk. His dialogue put me in mind of David Mamet’s remark that modern US drama is mainly about people not talking to each other. One by one, the Essingers come under fire, but they counter with deft defensive tactics.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 04 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

There are other new books about the El Faro’s sinking...But Slade’s book devotes the most time to the Coast Guard inquiry, and this sets “Into the Raging Sea” apart.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jul 03 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

The book might end on a redemptive note of sorts – after a great deal of horror and bloodshed – but it’s hard to feel the cathartic relief that Howarth clearly expects. This is nonetheless the work of an able and intriguing new writer; one hopes that his next book will develop his considerable strengths further.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jul 01 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

...I expect many readers will find Bridle’s perceptive and thought-provoking book terrifying rather than enjoyable – but then as I implied at the outset, I’m very much of the glass half- empty type.

Guardian

Rating Above average

Reviewed on Jun 30 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

While “Still Lives” is a deeply affecting examination of how our culture fetishizes female victims of crime — be it in art, news, or publishing — it will also have readers feverishly turning pages...

LA Times

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 29 2018

Read Full Review | See more by LA Times

One of the reasons they come so thrillingly alive on the page is because he successfully portrays them in many different guises — as artists, socialites, iconoclasts and resistance fighters. In each case he gets under their skin and into their minds.

Star Tribune

Rating Good

Reviewed on Jun 28 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Star Tribune

The novel shows some early promise – a discussion of their displacement from Lebanon is illuminating, and contrasts are set up between the friends’ faiths - but sadly this is not explored with any degree of depth. Instead, indirect inner monologues create flat and binary characters...

Guardian

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jun 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by Guardian

None of which is to say Red Waters isn't worth it. An un-stuck landing lingers like a bad taste sometimes, but this one comes at the end of an otherwise fascinating story of tension and friction between old friends and new enemies...

NPR

Rating Below average

Reviewed on Jun 27 2018

Read Full Review | See more by NPR