A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit

69%

8 Critic Reviews

Solnit's writing is as abstract and intangible as her subject, veering between oceanic lyricism ("Blue is the color of longing for the distance you never arrive in")...that seem profound but are actually banal once you think about them.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

Whether she is contemplating the history of walking as a cultural and political experience over the past two hundred years (Wanderlust), or using the life of photographer Eadweard Muybridge as a lens to discuss the transformations of space and time in late nineteenth-century America (River of Shadows), Rebecca Solnit has emerged as an inventive and original writer whose mind is daring in the connections it makes. A Field Guide to Getting Lost draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Solnit's own life to explore issues of wandering, being lost, and the uses of the unknown. The result is a distinctive, stimulating, and poignant voyage of discovery.
 

About Rebecca Solnit

See more books from this Author
Rebecca Solnit is the author of ten books. In 2003, she received the prestigious Lannan Literary Award.
 
Published June 27, 2006 by Penguin Books. 236 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Travel. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for A Field Guide to Getting Lost
All: 8 | Positive: 7 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Above average
on May 01 2005

Elegant essays marked by surprising shifts and unexpected connections.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost | See more reviews from Kirkus

Guardian

Above average
on May 06 2006

Solnit starts this collection of nine short, brilliant essays with a quotation that she was given by a student: "How will you go about finding that thing the nature of which is unknown to you?"

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
on Mar 26 2006

It is no more than a series of vaguely connected thoughts from a fellow traveller, but it will leave you with a strange and joyful sense of rediscovering the adventure of living.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost | See more reviews from Guardian

Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Apr 18 2005

Solnit's writing is as abstract and intangible as her subject, veering between oceanic lyricism ("Blue is the color of longing for the distance you never arrive in")...that seem profound but are actually banal once you think about them.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Merle Rubin on Jul 06 2008

For the intrepid Blakean "mental traveler" as well as for travelers of the physical realms, "A Field Guide to Getting Lost" is a book to set you wandering down strangely fruitful trails of thought.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost | See more reviews from LA Times

The Seattle Times

Above average
Reviewed by Irene Wanner on Jul 15 2008

As I read the linked essays of "A Field Guide to Getting Lost," Rebecca Solnit's ninth nonfiction book, I was by turns enthralled, bored, puzzled, restless and delighted.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Bookin With Sunny.

Above average
Reviewed by Ann Ronald on Jun 25 2012

Rooted in a real-​​world travels and firmly grounded by the delib­er­a­tions of other authors, these smart, provocative essays follow the geog­raphy of Solnit’s mind in a way that will appeal to most readers.

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Feministing

Above average
Reviewed by Lori on Aug 17 2010

Solnit makes a case for embracing those moments in your life, large and small, where certainty escapes you and uncertainty abounds. She skillfully praises them as both romantic and practical, as integral to transformation...

Read Full Review of A Field Guide to Getting Lost

Reader Rating for A Field Guide to Getting Lost
79%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 81 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×