A General Theory of Love by Thomas Lewis

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews



Drawing comparisons to the most eloquent science writing of our day, three eminent psychiatrists tackle the difficult task of reconciling what artists and thinkers have known for thousands of years about the human heart with what has only recently been learned about the primitive functions of the human brain. The result is an original, lucid, at times moving account of the complexities of love and its essential role in human well-being.

A General Theory of Love draws on the latest scientific research to demonstrate that our nervous systems are not self-contained: from earliest childhood, our brains actually link with those of the people close to us, in a silent rhythm that alters the very structure of our brains, establishes life-long emotional patterns, and makes us, in large part, who we are. Explaining how relationships function, how parents shape their child’s developing self, how psychotherapy really works, and how our society dangerously flouts essential emotional laws, this is a work of rare passion and eloquence that will forever change the way you think about human intimacy.

From the Trade Paperback edition.

About Thomas Lewis

See more books from this Author
Thomas Lewis, M.D. is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, and a former associate director of the Affective Disorders Program there. Dr. Lewis currently divides his time between writing, private practice, and teaching at the UCSF medical school. He lives in Sausalito, California. Fari Amini, M.D. is a professor of psychiatry at the UCSF School of Medicine. Born and raised in Iran, he graduated from medical school at UCSF and has served on the faculty there for thirty-three years. Dr. Amini is married, has six children, and lives in Ross, California. Richard Lannon, M.D. is an associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCSF School of Medicine. In 1980, Dr. Lannon founded the Affective Disorders Program at UCSF, a pioneering effort to integrate psychological concepts with the emerging biology of the brain. Dr. Lannon is married and the father of two; he lives in Greenbrae, California.From the Hardcover edition.
Published December 18, 2007 by Vintage. 290 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Parenting & Relationships, Self Help, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for A General Theory of Love

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Those signals are read in the context of what the authors call “attractors,” neural networks that classify incoming information, rightly or wrongly, as “if it conformed to past experience.” If past experience has been good, the exchange of signals is mutual and reciprocal, that is, loving;

| Read Full Review of A General Theory of Love

Entertainment Weekly

A General Theory of Love: A- all about love: B- Originally posted Feb 11, 2000 Published in issue #525 Feb 11, 2000 Order article reprints

Feb 11 2000 | Read Full Review of A General Theory of Love

Entertainment Weekly

As the authors point out: ''Who we are and who we become depends, in part, on whom we love.'' In elegant prose that keeps the dry scientific jargon to a blessed minimum, they argue why certain widely held societal beliefs (career success equals happiness;

Feb 09 2000 | Read Full Review of A General Theory of Love

Reader Rating for A General Theory of Love

An aggregated and normalized score based on 208 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes

Rate this book!

Add Review