A Guide to the Mammals of China by Andrew T. Smith

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Synopsis

China's stunning diversity of natural habitats--from parched deserts to lush tropical forests--is home to more than 10 percent of the world's mammal species. A Guide to the Mammals of China is the most comprehensive guide to all 556 species of mammals found in China. It is the only single-volume reference of its kind to fully describe the physical characteristics, geographic distribution, natural history, and conservation status of every species. An up-to-date distribution map accompanies each species account, and color plates illustrate a majority of species. Written by a team of leading specialists, including Professor Wang Sung who provides a history of Chinese mammalogy, A Guide to the Mammals of China is the ideal reference for researchers and a delight for anyone interested in China's rich mammal fauna.

The definitive, comprehensive, up-to-date guide to all of China's 556 mammal species High-quality color plates accompany the detailed text Each species account comes with a distribution map Organized taxonomically for easy reference Includes an extensive bibliography
 

About Andrew T. Smith

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Andrew T. Smith is the Parents Association Professor of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. Yan Xie is associate research professor in the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Robert S. Hoffmann, now retired, was director of the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. Darrin Lunde is collections manager in the Department of Mammalogy at the American Museum of Natural History. John MacKinnon is a zoologist and writer whose many books include "A Field Guide to the Birds of China". Don E. Wilson is curator of mammals at the National Museum of Natural History. W. Chris Wozencraft (1953-2007) was professor of biology at Bethel College. Federico Gemma, based in Rome, is a wildlife artist and freelance natural-history illustrator.
 
Published April 23, 2010 by Princeton University Press. 576 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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