A Life of Jung by Ronald Hayman

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Synopsis

This "Meticulously Researched" (The Times [London]) biography explores the complex character of one of the world's most influential psychoanalysts. Having gained access to a substantial amount of previously unpublished material, Ronald Hayman offers a rare insight into how Jung's revolutionary ideas grew out of his own extraordinary experiences. With notable objectivity, Hayman investigates the most crucial questions surrounding this enigmatic figure. What actually went on during Jung's sessions with patients? Was his mother insane? Was he a borderline case? What were the consequences of a homosexual episode in his boyhood? Was he pro-Nazi or anti-Semitic? Why did he fail to sustain any of his friendships with men? Did he sometimes mean "God" when he said the "Unconscious"? Why was he so secretive?
 

About Ronald Hayman

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Ronald Hayman has authored numerous internationally acclaimed biographies, including works on Friedrich Nietzsche, Jean-Paul Sartre, Marcel Proust, Sylvia Plath, and Thomas Mann. He lives in London.
 
Published October 1, 1999 by Bloomsbury Pub Ltd. 522 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, History, Travel, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

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(Hughes also destroyed Plath's last journal, saying he did not want their children to have to face such an upsetting work.) Plath, Hayman shows, sought her disciplinarian father's love;

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Working from both Jung’s bulky correspondence and his scholarly writings (particularly Memories, Dreams, and Reflections), Hayman works up through Jung’s difficult childhood years, his important association with Freud, and onward to his independent work on myth and the collective unconscious.

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Indeed, Hayman shows how Hitler's attack on Jews gave Jung a chance to promote his own psychological theories (e.g., the defamation of Freud and other Jewish psychoanalysts led to the possibility for the ascendance of Jung's analytical psychology).

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