A Poet and Bin-Laden by Hamid Ismailov

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

But the wonderful story stands alone with its warring elephants, captive princesses and murderous sons. The beautiful, overlapping structure is like a tightly petalled rose.
-Guardian

Synopsis

A Poet and Bin-Laden is a novel set in Central Asia at the turn of the 21st century against a swirling backdrop of Islamic fundamentalism in the Ferghana Valley and beyond.


The story begins on the eve of 9/11, with the narrator’s haunting description of the airplane attack on the Twin Towers as seen on TV while he is on holiday in Central Asia. Subsequent chapters shift backwards and forwards in time, but two main themes emerge: the rise of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan under the charismatic but reclusive leadership of Tahir Yuldash and Juma Namangani; and the main character, poet Belgi’s movement from the outer edge of the circle, from the mountains of Osh, into the inner sanctum of al-Qaeda, and ultimately to a meeting with Sheikh bin Laden himself.


His journey begins with a search for a Sufi spiritual master and ends in guerrilla warfare, and it is this tension between a transcendental and a violent response to oppression, between the book and the bomb, that gives the novel its specific poignancy. Along the way, Ismailov provides wonderfully vivid accounts of historical events (as witnessed by Belgi) such as the siege of Kunduz, the breakout from Shebergan prison – a kind of Afghan Guantanamo – and the insurgency in the Ferghana Valley.


***


This title has been realised by a team of the following dedicated professionals:


Translated from Russian by Andrew Bromfield,


Poems translated by Richard MacKane,


Edited by Camilla Stein,


Maxim Hodak - Максим Ходак (Publisher), 


Max Mendor - Макс Мендор (Director), 


Yana Kovalskaya.

 

About Hamid Ismailov

See more books from this Author
Hamid Ismailov, regarded as a man of "unacceptably democratic tendencies" in Uzbekistan, was forced to flee his homeland, and so came to London in 1992. He was recruited by the BBC World Service to set up its Central Asia Service. He has published many books both in Russia and in Uzbekistan, but this is the first time his work has been translated into English. Robert Chandler has translated the poetry of Sappho and Guillaume Apollinaire, as well as novels by Vasily Grossman and Aleksandr Pushkin.
 
Published August 31, 2012 by Glagoslav. 266 pages
Genres: History, Religion & Spirituality, War, Literature & Fiction, Travel. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for A Poet and Bin-Laden
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Kate Kellaway on Dec 09 2012

But the wonderful story stands alone with its warring elephants, captive princesses and murderous sons. The beautiful, overlapping structure is like a tightly petalled rose.

Read Full Review of A Poet and Bin-Laden | See more reviews from Guardian

Rate this book!

Add Review