A Tale of Seven Elements by Eric Scerri

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Scerri enriches each minihistory with anecdotes of bitter rivalries, professional and personal frustrations...This brief and intriguing tale offers insights into the research process as well as the history of the periodic table as researchers vied to break new ground.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

In 1913, English physicist Henry Moseley established an elegant method for "counting" the elements based on atomic number, ranging them from hydrogen (#1) to uranium (#92). It soon became clear, however, that seven elements were mysteriously missing from the lineup--seven elements unknown to science.

In his well researched and engaging narrative, Eric Scerri presents the intriguing stories of these seven elements--protactinium, hafnium, rhenium, technetium, francium, astatine and promethium. The book follows the historical order of discovery, roughly spanning the two world wars, beginning with the isolation of protactinium in 1917 and ending with that of promethium in 1945. For each element, Scerri traces the research that preceded the discovery, the pivotal experiments, the personalities of the chemists involved, the chemical nature of the new element, and its applications in science and technology. We learn for instance that alloys of hafnium--whose name derives from the Latin name for Copenhagen (hafnia)--have some of the highest boiling points on record and are used for the nozzles in rocket thrusters such as the Apollo Lunar Modules. Scerri also tells the personal tales of researchers overcoming great obstacles. We see how Lise Meitner and Otto Hahn--the pair who later proposed the theory of atomic fission--were struggling to isolate element 91 when World War I intervened, Hahn was drafted into the German army's poison gas unit, and Meitner was forced to press on alone against daunting odds. The book concludes by examining how and where the twenty-five new elements have taken their places in the periodic table in the last half century.

A Tale of Seven Elements paints a fascinating picture of chemical research--the wrong turns, missed opportunities, bitterly disputed claims, serendipitous findings, accusations of dishonesty--all leading finally to the thrill of discovery.
 

About Eric Scerri

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Eric Scerri is a leading philosopher of science specializing in the history and philosophy of the periodic table. He is also the founder and editor in chief of the international journal Foundations of Chemistry and has been a full-time lecturer at UCLA for the past twelve years where he regularly teaches classes of 350 chemistry students as well as classes in history and philosophy of science. He is the author of The Periodic Table: Its Story and Its Significance and has given invited lectures all over the world.
 
Published May 20, 2013 by Oxford University Press. 304 pages
Genres: Science & Math, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for A Tale of Seven Elements
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Publishers Weekly

Good
on Apr 15 2013

Scerri enriches each minihistory with anecdotes of bitter rivalries, professional and personal frustrations...This brief and intriguing tale offers insights into the research process as well as the history of the periodic table as researchers vied to break new ground.

Read Full Review of A Tale of Seven Elements | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

WSJ online

Good
Reviewed by Peter Pesic on Sep 20 2013

Mr. Scerri writes clearly and calmly, without the impulse to overdramatize that can mar popular books about science...Mr. Scerri's outstanding book helps us understand the special spirit of chemistry, whose contribution to science and human experience emphasizes the crucible of experiment.

Read Full Review of A Tale of Seven Elements | See more reviews from WSJ online

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