Across the Wire by Luis Urrea
Life and Hard Times on the Mexican Border

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Synopsis

            Luis Alberto Urrea's Across the Wire offers a compelling and unprecedented look at what life is like for those refugees living on the Mexican side of the border—a world that is only some twenty miles from San Diego, but that few have seen.  Urrea gives us a compassionate and candid account of his work as a member and "official translator" of a crew of relief workers that provided aid to the many refugees hidden just behind the flashy tourist spots of Tijuana.  His account of the struggle of these people to survive amid abject poverty, unsanitary living conditions, and the legal and political chaos that reign in the Mexican borderlands explains without a doubt the reason so many are forced to make the dangerous and illegal journey "across the wire" into the United States.
            More than just an expose, Across the Wire is a tribute to the tenacity of a people who have learned to survive against the most impossible odds, and returns to these forgotten people their pride and their identity.  




From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Luis Urrea

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Luis Alberto Urrea is author of widely acclaimed novel The Hummingbird's Daughter and 2005 Pulitzer Prize finalist for nonfiction for The Devil's Highway. A member of the Latino Literature Hall of Fame, Luis was born in Tijuana, Mexico to a Mexican father and an American mother. This is his first graphic novel and Young Adult title.
 
Published December 1, 2010 by Anchor. 210 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Computers & Technology, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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After a brief look at the plight of ``undocumented workers'' crossing into the US, Urrea focuses on the families that remain on the Mexican side, scavenging a living from the border's comparative wealth: One trash-picker, originally from Michoac†n, explains that ``At least here you have garbage!'';

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Publishers Weekly

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Urrea, a Mexican-born American, worked from 1978 to 1982 for a Protestant aid group in Tijuana, and he wrote these fragmentary, evocative tales of heartbreak and hope for the San Diego Reader after he

Jan 04 1993 | Read Full Review of Across the Wire: Life and Har...

Publishers Weekly

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Urrea, a Mexican-born American, worked from 1978 to 1982 for a Protestant aid group in Tijuana, and he wrote these fragmentary, evocative tales of heartbreak and hope for the San Diego Reader after he returned to the region in 1990.

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Los Angeles Times

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Twenty minutes from downtown San Diego is the secret place that Luis Alberto Urrea calls "the Borderlands," a festering nether world of orphanages and garbage dumps and "pig villages," where the poorest of the poor from all over Latin America cling precariously to the underside of the Third World.

Feb 10 1993 | Read Full Review of Across the Wire: Life and Har...

The Seattle Times

Their disastrous sun-baked odyssey, an ordeal that claimed 14 lives, is the subject of Luis Alberto Urrea's "The Devil's Highway: A True Story" (Little, Brown, 239 pp., $24.95), a stunning work of narrative journalism that puts a much-needed face on a notoriously divisive issue.

Apr 30 2004 | Read Full Review of Across the Wire: Life and Har...

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