Admissions by Henry Marsh
A Life in Brain Surgery

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There are, though, fewer such moments in Mr Marsh’s new book. Those expecting a second “Do No Harm” will be surprised, but not disappointed. “Admissions” is more about the man than the surgeon, but it is excellent in its own right.
-The Economist

Synopsis

Following the publication of Do No Harm, Dr. Henry Marsh retired from his position at a hospital in London. But his career continued, taking him to remote hospitals in places such as Nepal and Ukraine, where he offers his services as surgeon and teacher to those in need. Now, Marsh considers the challenges of working in those difficult conditions, alongside the challenges of putting a career of forty years behind you and finding further purpose in life and work.

In Admissions, Marsh offers a thoughtful, perceptive consideration of medicine and the pursuit of a meaningful life that will appeal to readers of Atul Gawande, Jerome Groopman, and Oliver Sacks.

 

About Henry Marsh

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HENRY MARSH studied medicine at the Royal Free Hospital in London, became a Fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons in 1984 and was appointed Consultant Neurosurgeon at Atkinson Morley's/St George's Hospital in London in 1987. He has been the subject of two major documentary films, Your Life in Their Hands, which won the Royal Television Society Gold Medal, and The English Surgeon, which won an Emmy. He was made a CBE in 2010. He is married to the anthropologist and writer Kate Fox.
 
Published October 3, 2017 by Thomas Dunne Books. 288 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Admissions
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

The Economist

Above average
on May 13 2017

There are, though, fewer such moments in Mr Marsh’s new book. Those expecting a second “Do No Harm” will be surprised, but not disappointed. “Admissions” is more about the man than the surgeon, but it is excellent in its own right.

Read Full Review of Admissions: A Life in Brain S... | See more reviews from The Economist

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Gavin Francis on May 13 2017

...people with debilitating illness often admit to taking comfort from the knowledge that escape is open to them, even if they never take it, and it seems the same might be said of Marsh. His book is infused with a sense of urgency, as if he senses his time might be short. For his sake, and for the sake of his readers, I hope he’s wrong.

Read Full Review of Admissions: A Life in Brain S... | See more reviews from Guardian

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