Advice and Dissent by Alan S. Blinder
Why America Suffers When Economics and Politics Collide

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He makes a forceful case for old-fashioned bipartisan economic policymaking that “is deeply concerned with both preserving and enhancing the efficiency of the market system and with improving the lot of society’s least fortunate citizens.”
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Synopsis

A bestselling economist tells us what both politicians and economists must learn to fix America's failing economic policies
American economic policy ranks as something between bad and disgraceful. As leading economist Alan S. Blinder argues, a crucial cultural divide separates economic and political civilizations. Economists and politicians often talk--and act--at cross purposes: politicians typically seek economists' "advice" only to support preconceived notions, not to learn what economists actually know or believe. Politicians naturally worry about keeping constituents happy and winning elections. Some are devoted to an ideology. Economists sometimes overlook the real human costs of what may seem to be the obviously best policy--to a calculating machine. In Advice and Dissent, Blinder shows how both sides can shrink the yawning gap between good politics and good economics and encourage the hardheaded but softhearted policies our country so desperately needs.
 

About Alan S. Blinder

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Published March 27, 2018 by Basic Books. 368 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference. Non-fiction
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Kirkus

Above average
on Jan 23 2018

He makes a forceful case for old-fashioned bipartisan economic policymaking that “is deeply concerned with both preserving and enhancing the efficiency of the market system and with improving the lot of society’s least fortunate citizens.”

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