Aerotropolis by John D. Kasarda
The Way We'll Live Next

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Synopsis

This brilliant and eye-opening look at the new phenomenon called the aerotropolis gives us a glimpse of the way we will live in the near future--and the way we will do business too.



Not so long ago, airports were built near cities, and roads connected the one to the other. This pattern--the city in the center, the airport on the periphery-- shaped life in the twentieth century, from the central city to exurban sprawl. Today, the ubiquity of jet travel, round-the-clock workdays, overnight shipping, and global business networks has turned the pattern inside out. Soon the airport will be at the center and the city will be built around it, the better to keep workers, suppliers, executives, and goods in touch with the global market.



This is the aerotropolis: a combination of giant airport, planned city, shipping facility, and business hub. The aerotropolis approach to urban living is now reshaping life in Seoul and Amsterdam, in China and India, in Dallas and Washington, D.C. The aerotropolis is the frontier of the next phase of globalization, whether we like it or not.



John D. Kasarda defined the term "aerotropolis," and he is now sought after worldwide as an adviser. Working with Kasarda's ideas and research, the gifted journalist Greg Lindsay gives us a vivid, at times disquieting look at these instant cities in the making, the challenges they present to our environment and our usual ways of life, and the opportunities they offer to those who can exploit them creatively. Aerotropolis is news from the near future--news we urgently need if we are to understand the changing world and our place in it.


 

About John D. Kasarda

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John D. Kasarda, a professor at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina, has advised countries, cities, and companies about the aerotropolis and its implications. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Greg Lindsay has written for The New York Times, BusinessWeek, and Fast Company. For one story he traveled around the world by airplane for three weeks, never leaving the airport while on the ground. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
Published March 1, 2011 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 481 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Professional & Technical, Political & Social Sciences, Computers & Technology, Science & Math, Self Help, Parenting & Relationships. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Aerotropolis

Kirkus Reviews

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Because the emirates are blank slates for the experiment, and, as one Abu Dhabi–based technologist says, “because we can fly nineteen hours nonstop now, we’re able to reach any city in the world from here.” The brave new world is on the way, and it’s coming in by air.

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The New York Times

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The gleam in a futurist’s eye is a mega-airport in the center of every major city.

Mar 04 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

The Guardian

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An aerotropolis is a city with an airport at its centre, rather than its periphery, "a new kind of city, one native to our era of instant gratification – call it the instant age".

Feb 26 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

The Guardian

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In his dystopian novel The Sleeper Awakes, begun in 1899, HG Wells portrayed a future world in which vast machine-like cities were linked by air travel.

Mar 18 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

Publishers Weekly

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Financial journalist Lindsay introduces readers to the ideas of academic and global management guru Kasarda, explicating and championing Kasarda's concept of the aerotropolis, urban design premised on the centrality of air transport, air routes, and airports.

Nov 22 2010 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

The Wall Street Journal

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(In places like Dubai global homebuyers acquire houses but never really move in.) And once the aerotropolis model has been ironed out, the authors assert, there will be little reason to reinvent the wheel: The successful model will simply be replicated world-wide—resulting in pop-up cities with...

Mar 02 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

The Telegraph

Shaking off its Coketown sooty image, and straining against the concrete straitjacket of post-war urban planning, many are beginning to believe that the new city of the 21st century might actually be the best place to live and, moreover, that the city itself offers us the best possibl...

Mar 13 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

"Welcome Home to the Airport" is a provocative chapter that describes the decade-long cycle of airport construction and population shifts in Denver, where Stapleton Airport, which "strangled on its own success" was closed, and a new larger one was built much further away.

Mar 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

Scotsman.com

CITIES are built up in layers over hundreds, or even thousands of years, and with each passing century the contributions of our predecessors become more and more obsolete.

Mar 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

Business Week

Cities, they write, will need to be arrayed around airports in concentric circles of business and residential zones, as they are in New Songdo and Hyderabad, India.

Feb 24 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

Wharf

Lindsay, aided by guru Kasarda shows how the formula works: a city builds an airport far, far away, the city migrates towards the airport, the airport becomes the city.

Mar 23 2011 | Read Full Review of Aerotropolis: The Way We'll L...

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