Aesop's Fox by Aki Sogabe

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Synopsis

One summer morning, Fox awakens and begins his search for food. His travels take him to a vineyard, where the unreachable grapes are probably sour, and to a conversation with Rooster and Crow, during which flattery first fails but then succeeds. Fox meets--among others--foolish Donkey, wise Boar, vain Leopard, and shrewd Lion. With each meeting, Fox gains wisdom--until at the end of the day, falling asleep in the hollow of a tree, he says, “Time fixes everything.” And so it does.
 

About Aki Sogabe

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No Bio Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth. Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children.
 
Published August 2, 1999 by HMH Books for Young Readers. 32 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Aesop's Fox

Kirkus Reviews

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Bold, cut-paper illustrations in shades of brown and green show Fox as he meets Rooster, Boar Crow, Leopard, Lion, Rabbit, Deer, Donkey, and Raccoon, every one of whom has a nugget of wisdom to impart.

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Publishers Weekly

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Though Sogabe's (The Loyal Cat) cut-paper illustrations are glorious, they cannot disguise the pedestrian, plodding tone of the story, which strings together several brief tales about a fox. Many of t

Aug 02 1999 | Read Full Review of Aesop's Fox

Publishers Weekly

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For example, when Fox decides the elusive grapes are sour, a boar conveniently observes the proceedings and remarks, ""We often pretend to dislike what we can't have."" In others, the moral's connection to Aesop is less obvious (e.g., a dying Old Lion beckons to Fox to come closer, and Fox respon...

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Publishers Weekly

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Though Sogabe's (The Loyal Cat) cut-paper illustrations are glorious, they cannot disguise the pedestrian, plodding tone of the story, which strings together several brief tales about a fox. Many of t

Aug 02 1999 | Read Full Review of Aesop's Fox

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