Aesop's Funky Fables by Aesop
(Viking Kestrel picture books)

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Synopsis

Here's Aesop with a differenceStoryteller and playwright, Vivian French brings an original voice to these clever and accessible retellings of the famous Greek tales. From the boy who cries wolf to shake up his dull day to the mouse who tells the lion "I will chew right through/All the ropes/Until you are free/Like me", the tricks and foibles of Aesop's best-loved characters are captured here as never before. Add to this the wild inventiveness and rich detail of Korky Paul's illustrations and you end up with the funkiest fables around!
 

About Aesop

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Though many modern scholars dispute his existence, Aesop's life was chronicled by first century Greek historians who wrote that Aesop, or Aethiop, was born into Greek slavery in 620 B.C. Freed because of his wit and wisdom, Aesop supposedly traveled throughout Greece and was employed at various times by the governments of Athens and Corinth. Some of Aesop's most recognized fables are The Tortoise and the Hare, The Fox and the Grapes, and The Ant and the Grasshopper. His simple but effective morals are widely used and illustrated for children.
 
Published February 1, 1998 by Viking Juvenile. 80 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Political & Social Sciences, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Aesop's Funky Fables

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This British import adds a catchy, contemporary kick to Aesop's moral tales. The fables vary in form, including rhymes and monologues as well as narrative; they share, however, an unbridled use of sou

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However, the lessons of lesser-known parables may elude younger readers--such as the tale of Zeus refusing a wedding gift from a snake (""Never accept the offerings of a villain,"" when nothing in the tale suggests the snake's evil intentions) or the tale of a caged songbird and a bat (""Regrets ...

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For example, when Fox decides the elusive grapes are sour, a boar conveniently observes the proceedings and remarks, ""We often pretend to dislike what we can't have."" In others, the moral's connection to Aesop is less obvious (e.g., a dying Old Lion beckons to Fox to come closer, and Fox respon...

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Hague brings his signature nostalgic, intricately detailed style to 13 of Aesop's moral tales.

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Paxton and Rayevsky are on a roll--in their fourth joint venture they return once again to Aesop territory, putting their unique spin on 10 more of the master's fables.

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they share, however, an unbridled use of sound effects, as in the start of ""The Fox and the Crow"": ""Once upon a time there was a fox/ (Fox fox fox fox fox fox fox)."" When the dog of ""The Dog and the Bone"" sees his reflection in a stream, the text takes his single-minded, greedy viewpoint: "...

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This British import adds a catchy, contemporary kick to Aesop's moral tales. The fables vary in form, including rhymes and monologues as well as narrative; they share, however, an unbridled use of sou

Feb 02 1998 | Read Full Review of Aesop's Funky Fables (Viking ...

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