Afghanistan in the Cinema by Mark Graham

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Synopsis

In this timely critical introduction to the representation of Afghanistan in film, Mark Graham examines the often surprising combination of propaganda and poetry in films made in Hollywood and the East. Through the lenses of postcolonial theory and historical reassessment, Graham analyzes what these films say about Afghanistan, Islam, and the West and argues that they are integral tools for forming discourse on Afghanistan, a means for understanding and avoiding past mistakes, and symbols of the country's shaky but promising future. Thoughtfully addressing many of the misperceptions about Afghanistan perpetuated in the West, Afghanistan in the Cinema incorporates incisive analysis of the market factors, funding sources, and political agendas that have shaped the films. _x000B__x000B_The book considers a range of films, beginning with the 1970s epics The Man Who Would Become King and The Horsemen and following the shifts in representation of the Muslim world during the Russian War in films such as The Beast and Rambo III. Graham then moves on to Taliban-era films such as Kandahar, Osama, and Ellipsis, the first Afghan film directed by a woman. Lastly, the book discusses imperialist nostalgia in films such as Charlie Wilson's War and destabilizing visions represented in contemporary works such as The Kite Runner. _x000B_
 

About Mark Graham

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Mark Graham is the illustrator of several children's books, including Come Meet Muffin! and Where is Little Reynard? by Joyce Carol Oates. A graduate of Columbia University, Graham studied for several years at the Art Students League of New York and has taught at the university level. He lives with his family in Port Washington, New York.
 
Published April 5, 2010 by University of Illinois Press. 208 pages
Genres: History, Humor & Entertainment, Travel.

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