African American Women Speak Out on Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas by Barbara Brandon
(African American Life)

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When Anita Hill reluctantly appeared before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee in October 1991 charging that Supreme Court Justice nominee Clarence Thomas had sexually harassed her, she did more that force the re-opening of Thomas' Senate confirmation hearing. Her allegation was also the catalyst for what would become a unique and extraordinarily complex moment in U.S. history—immediate and wide-ranging debate and discussion across racial, gender, and class lines about gender issues in the workplace, sexual stereotypes, white male political hegemony, and the tensions of class and race in the U.S. women's movement. Though central to the controversy, the voices of African American women could barely be heard. African American Women Speak Out on Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas contains reflections as well as in-depth analyses by African American women scholars and writers on the confrontation and its broader meaning for the African American community.

About Barbara Brandon

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Geneva Smitherman is University Distinguished Professor of English and Director of the African American Language and Literacy Program at Michigan State University. The author of BLACK TALK: WORDS AND PHRASES FROM THE HOOD TO THE AMEN CORNER and TALKIN THAT TALK: LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND EDUCATION IN AFRICAN AMERICA and the editor of AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN SPEAK OUT ON ANITA HILL-CLARENCE THOMAS, she also directs the My Brother's Keeper Program in Detroit.
Published June 1, 1995 by Wayne State University Press. 280 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

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