Alexander Hamilton by Alexander Hamilton
Writings (Library of America)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 14 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

One of the most vivid, influential, and controversial figures of the American founding, Alexander Hamilton was an unusually prolific and vigorous writer. As a military aide to George Washington, forceful critic of the Articles of Confederation, persuasive proponent of ratification of the Constitution, first Secretary of the Treasury, and leader of the Federalist party, Hamilton devoted himself to the creation of a militarily and economically powerful American nation guided by a strong republican government. His public and private writings demonstrate the perceptive intelligence, confident advocacy, driving ambition, and profound concern for honor and reputation that contributed both to his rise to fame and to his tragic early death.

Arranged chronologically, Writings contains more than 170 letters, speeches, essays, reports, and memoranda written between 1769 and 1804. Included are all 51 of Hamilton's contributions to The Federalist, as well as subsequent writing calling for a broad construction of federal power under the Constitution; his famous speech to the Constitutional Convention, which gave rise to accusations that he favored monarchy; early writings supporting the Revolutionary cause and a stronger central government; his visionary reports as Treasury secretary on the public credit, a national bank, and the encouragement of American manufactures; a detailed confession of adultery made by Hamilton in order to defend himself against charges of official misconduct; and his self- destructive attack on John Adams during the 1800 campaign. An extensive selection of private letters illuminates Hamilton's complex relationship with George Washington, his deep affection for his wife and children, his mounting fears during the 1790s regarding the Jeffersonian opposition and the French Revolution, and his profound distrust of Aaron Burr. Included in an appendix are conflicting eyewitness accounts of the Hamilton-Burr duel.

Joanne Freeman is the editor.
 

About Alexander Hamilton

See more books from this Author
Alexander Hamilton (1757-1804) was born in the West Indies and served during the War of Independence as a captain. His military brilliance was recognized, and he was sent on several important military commissions. He was George Washington's secretary and aide-de-camp and in 1787 become a Member of the Constitutional Convention. From 1789 to 1795 he was the first Secretary of the Treasury, and in 1801 he held the casting vote against Burr and for Jefferson. He fought a duel with Burr and died the next day.
 
Published October 15, 2001 by Library of America. 1108 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Alexander Hamilton

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

“In all probability,” writes financial historian/biographer Chernow (Titan, 1998, etc.), “Alexander Hamilton is the foremost political figure in American history who never attained the presidency, yet he probably had a much deeper and lasting impact than many who did.” Indeed, we live in a Hamilt...

Jan 15 2004 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

While Brookhiser (Founding Father: Rediscovering George Washington, 1996), an editor at the National Review and a contributor to the New York Observer, is dead wrong that “there is nothing else by or about” Alexander Hamilton (what of biographies by Jacob Cooke, Broadus Mitchell, and Nathan Schac...

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

''The manner in which a thing is done,'' Hamilton once advised a future mayor of New York, ''has more influence than is commonly imagined.'' Today he is remembered for his deeds -- arguing New York into ratifying the Constitution, financing the Revolutionary War debt, founding the first national ...

Nov 11 2001 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

Hamilton Grange Alexander Hamilton's house is reopening at its new site, in St. Nicholas Park in Hamilton Heights.

Sep 15 2011 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Although he doesn't provide a substantive analysis of Hamilton's work (just four pages are given to the Federalist papers, arguably the most important contribution of Hamilton's career), Brookhiser gives us a valuable, incisive portrait both of Hamilton's character and of the character of young A...

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

The American Revolution) dives deep into the causes and aftermath of Burr's duel with Hamilton on the banks of the Hudson at Weehawken, showing that, while not an innocent, Burr was no more guilty than Hamilton in provoking the exchange.

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Possessing the most powerful (though not the most profound) intelligence of his gifted contemporaries, Hamilton rose from Caribbean bastardy through military service in Washington's circle to historic importance at an early age and then, in a new era of partisan politics, gradually lost his polit...

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Here’s what I think you know about Alexander Hamilton: he was shot in a duel with Aaron Burr (who you don’t know much about, either).

Jun 20 2006 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Bookmarks Magazine

The author’s elaboration on the minutiae of Hamilton’s life pushes the book to an exhausting length, and some critics, particularly Randall (author of the recent Alexander Hamilton: A Life) questioned the speculative, novelistic nature of the book.

Oct 25 2009 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

National Review Online

Burr tried to pretend that the electoral votes cast for him in the 1800 election were for president and not vice president, as they were not differentiated at that time, and he drew with the real presidential candidate, Thomas Jefferson, and both came ahead of the incumbent president, John Adams.

Sep 22 2011 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

The New York Review of Books

If it is true that one can learn much about a people by its choice of heroes, then a study of Alexander Hamilton and his reputation among Americans during his lifetime and thereafter should be instructive.

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

New York Magazine

“He was the messenger of America’s economic future,” Chernow notes, “setting forth a vision of an urban manufacturing society.” But as Chernow further notes, “the sad irony was that Hamilton, the quintessential New Yorker, bar...

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

New York Magazine

New York has never quite gotten the recognition it deserves in the narrative of America’s founding.

| Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

HistoryNet

Burr's own Napoleonic vision involved either the Federalist dream of a secessionist state that included New England and New York, or some grand design encompassing Spanish Mexico and portions of the Western United States.

Aug 11 2001 | Read Full Review of Alexander Hamilton: Writings ...

Reader Rating for Alexander Hamilton
97%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 9 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review