All Stories Are True by John Edgar Wideman

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Synopsis

The stories in this book are about African Americans from all walks of life who reside in Homewood - a black section of Pittsburg. The stories are about ancestors, family and lovers caught in the vortex of American history and haunted by their own particular demons.
 

About John Edgar Wideman

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JOHN EDGAR WIDEMAN is the author of more than twenty works of fiction and nonfiction, including the award-winning Brothers and Keepers, Philadelphia Fire, and most recently the story collection God's Gym. He is the recipient of two PEN/ Faulkner Awards and has been nominated for the National Book Award. He teaches at Brown University.
 
Published August 1, 1993 by Helion Records. 448 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for All Stories Are True

Kirkus Reviews

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This hefty collection reprints Wideman's previous volumes of stories, Fever (1989) and Damballah (1981)--which are also being reprinted this year by the University of Pittsburgh Press as part of a single hardback edition of Wideman's "Homewood Books"--and also includes ten new pieces.

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Publishers Weekly

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In the 35 stories collected here Wideman continues to chronicle the black experience in urban America with great intensity and lyricism. (Aug.)

Aug 02 1993 | Read Full Review of All Stories Are True

Publishers Weekly

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Pushing the boundaries of narrative and form, two-time PEN/Faulkner Award–winner Wideman (Hoop Roots , etc.) delivers a sometimes electric and sometimes confounding collection of 10 short stories.

Jan 10 2005 | Read Full Review of All Stories Are True

Publishers Weekly

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it features 10 new stories told in the voices of parents whose son is incarcerated, the adult siblings of the jailed man, and the criminal himself, who resigns himself to the consequences of his misdeeds.

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Publishers Weekly

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In the 35 stories collected here Wideman continues to chronicle the black experience in urban America with great intensity and lyricism. (Aug.)

Aug 02 1993 | Read Full Review of All Stories Are True

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