All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren

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It is as bumpy and uneven as a corduroy road, somewhat irresolute and confused in its approach to vital problems and not always convincing.
-NY Times

Synopsis

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize, Robert Penn Warren’s tale of ambition and power set in the Depression–era South is widely considered the finest novel ever written about American politics.


All the King’s Men traces the rise and fall of demagogue Willie Stark, a fictional character loosely based on Governor Huey “Kingfish” Long of Louisiana. Stark begins his political career as an idealistic man of the people but soon becomes corrupted by success and caught between dreams of service and an insatiable lust for power, culminating in a novel that Sinclair Lewis pronounced, on the book’s release in 1946, “one of our few national galleries of character.”

 

About Robert Penn Warren

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Robert Penn Warren (1905-1989) won three Pulitzer Prizes, the National Book Award, the National Medal for Literature, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 1986 he was named the country's first poet laureate.
 
Published September 1, 1996 by Mariner Books. 656 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, History, War, Children's Books. Fiction
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NY Times

Below average
Reviewed by ORVILLE PRESCOTT on Aug 19 2013

It is as bumpy and uneven as a corduroy road, somewhat irresolute and confused in its approach to vital problems and not always convincing.

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Michael Manley 20 Aug 2013

Rated the book as 5 out of 5

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