All the Money in the World by Laura Vanderkam
What the Happiest People Know About Getting and Spending

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Synopsis

How happy would you be if you had all the money in the world?
 
The universal lament about money is that there is never enough. We spend endless hours trying to figure out ways to stretch every dollar and kicking ourselves whenever we spend too much or save too little. For all the stress and effort we put into every choice, why are most of us unhappy about our finances?
 
According to Laura Vanderkam, the key is to change your perspective. Instead of looking at money as a scarce resource, consider it a tool that you can use creatively to build a better life for yourself and the people you care about. Drawing on the latest happiness research as well as the stories of dozens of real people, Vanderkam offers a contrarian approach that forces us to examine our own beliefs, goals, and values.

 

About Laura Vanderkam

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LAURA VANDERKAM is the author of 168 Hours and a member of USA Today's board of contributors. Her writing has also appeared in BNET, The Wall Street Journal, Scientific American, and Reader's Digest, among other publications. She lives outside Philadelphia with her husband and two sons.
 
Published March 1, 2012 by Portfolio. 254 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Self Help. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for All the Money in the World

Kirkus Reviews

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She offers a road map about how this might be accomplished and substantiates her claim that “the resources we already have or can obtain can do more for our happiness than we think.” A key tenet is that our happiness is not based on the accumulation of big-ticket items—diamond engagement rings, s...

Jan 01 2012 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

Publishers Weekly

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Money is a powerful, complicated thing, and our beliefs about it—and behavior around it—are muddled, says Vanderkam (168 Hours).

Nov 28 2011 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

New York Journal of Books

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“Ms. Vanderkam's interesting book argues that much of what we want is within reach. ‘Every dollar is a choice,’ and often we make those choices without thinking them through. . . . many who read this book will have the means to attain happiness with far less than all the money in the world. And M...

Mar 01 2012 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

BookPage

Underlying her look at family size, wedding expenses, backyard chicken ranching and other costly endeavors is the knowledge that while none of us will ever have all the money in the world, many of us have more than we need and don’t realize it.

Mar 01 2012 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

Wired

Money spent on one thing is money not spent one something else, and these choices have consequences for our happiness and the happiness of those we vow to love.

Apr 09 2012 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

Get Rich Slowly

(Of course these are the same people who think they should all get 5 weeks vacation minimum and be able to wear jeans to work because “that’s what they do at Google.” A small software company of 18 people is hardly the same and at Google most people work much longer hours.

Jun 29 2012 | Read Full Review of All the Money in the World: W...

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