American Tempest by Harlow Giles Unger
How the Boston Tea Party Sparked a Revolution

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Synopsis

On Thursday, December 16, 1773, an estimated seven dozen men, many dressed as Indians, dumped roughly £10,000 worth of tea in Boston Harbor. Whatever their motives at the time, they unleashed a social, political, and economic firestorm that would culminate in the Declaration of Independence two-and-a-half years later.

The Boston Tea Party provoked a reign of terror in Boston and other American cities as tea parties erupted up and down the colonies. The turmoil stripped tens of thousands of their homes and property, and nearly 100,000 left forever in what was history's largest exodus of Americans from America. Nonetheless, John Adams called the Boston Tea Party nothing short of "magnificent," saying that "it must have important consequences."

Combining stellar scholarship with action-packed history, Harlow Giles Unger reveals the truth behind the legendary event and examines its lasting consequence--the spawning of a new, independent nation.

 

About Harlow Giles Unger

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A former Distinguished Visiting Fellow in American History at George Washington's Mount Vernon, Harlow Giles Unger is a veteran journalist, broadcaster, educator, and historian. He is the author of twenty books, including six biographies of America's Founding Fathers and two other histories of the early republic.
 
Published March 8, 2011 by Da Capo Press. 304 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy, Travel, War, Parenting & Relationships, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for American Tempest

Kirkus Reviews

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A solidly researched account of the 1773 Boston Tea Party.

Mar 01 2011 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

Publishers Weekly

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Ironically, few, if any, Americans today%E2%80%94even those who call themselves Tea Party Patriots%E2%80%94know the true and entire story of the original Tea Party and the Patriots who staged it. Jo

Mar 21 2011 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

Publishers Weekly

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Unger devotes substantial energy to Hancock's private life and habits (Hancock's fondness for almost regal accoutrements was controversial), but his marriage to Dorothy Quincy, as handled by Unger, remains frustratingly enigmatic.

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Publishers Weekly

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"Ironically, few, if any, Americans today—even those who call themselves Tea Party Patriots—know the true and entire story of the original Tea Party and the Patriots who staged it."

Mar 21 2011 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

BC Books

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And if, as is likely, it turns out that our beginnings were messier and not quite as noble as we were led to believe back when Mad Men and their professorial ilk were writing the history, well, messy beginnings often have fine results.

Mar 16 2012 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

New York Journal of Books

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In no way are those two words a testimonial to or suggestive of Harlow Giles Unger’s American Tempest: How the Boston Tea Party Sparked a Revolution.The publicist’s letter accompanying the review copy ended its first paragraph with this sentence: “The Boston Tea Party and its patriots had started...

Mar 15 2011 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

Portland Book Review

Fifty to sixty men went on board a ship in the Boston Harbor and threw all the tea that was on the ship into the water in a refusal to pay the duties that the British government placed on the tea.

May 22 2012 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

The Roanoke Times

In the decade before the convention that led to our Constitution, the continental government was as unrepresentative of the people as it had been in pre-Revolutionary times, and taxes imposed by states — which had to take on new responsibilities — were far more burdensome than under the crown.

Apr 10 2011 | Read Full Review of American Tempest: How the Bos...

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