Andrew Jackson by Robert V. Remini
(Great Generals)

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Synopsis

The newest addition to Palgrave's Great Generals series focuses on Andrew Jackson's career including his time as a general in Tennessee and his rise up the Army ranks. Jackson's effective use of spies in war time and of martial law in peace time sparked a debate about the curtailing of civil liberties in the name of national security that continues to this day. Most of all, Jackson was a great motivator who could, with a few carefully selected words and by his own brave example, turn around starved, deserting troops, convincing them to fight. With dramatic scenes of fierce battles and victories, Remini reveals here why Jackson's bold leadership as a general led to his election as President of the United States in 1828.


 

About Robert V. Remini

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Robert V. Remini is Professor Emeritus of History and the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Called the foremost Jacksonian scholar of our time by The New York Times, he is the recipient of a National Book Award. His most recent book is Andrew Jackson and His Indian Wars. Series editor, Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., is the preeminent historian of our time. For more than half a century, he has been a cornerstone figure in the intellectual life of the nation and a fixture on the political scene. He served as a special assistant to John F. Kennedy; won two Pulitzer Prizes for The Age of Jackson and A Thousand Days; and in 1998 received the National Humanities Medal. he published the first volume of his autobiography, A Life in the Twentieth Century, in 2000.
 
Published September 2, 2008 by Palgrave Macmillan Trade. 224 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, War, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Andrew Jackson

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As in its two predecessors--Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 17671821 (1977) and Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Freedom, 1822-1832 (1981)--Remini smoothly and effectively links Jackson's private torments (the violent hemorrhages, the destruction by fire of his beloved ...

Jun 01 1984 | Read Full Review of Andrew Jackson (Great Generals)

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The sequel to Remini's Andrew Jackson and the Course of American Empire, 1767-1821 (1977), beginning with the germination of Jackson's presidential ambitions and concluding--successfully, on the whole--with his landslide election to a second term.

Aug 19 1981 | Read Full Review of Andrew Jackson (Great Generals)

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Here is a detailed account of the election campaign in which Andrew Jackson defeated John Quincy Adams for a second term as President.

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This is a detailed account of the bitter election campaign in which Andrew Jackson defeated John Quincy Adams for a second term as President.

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Anyone who read through Boardman's America and the Jacksonian Era (KR, p. 79, J-31) without grasping just what was at issue in the Bank War or forming any firm opinions about the nature of Jacksonian democracy will appreciate this excellent, highly concentrated essay.

Mar 31 1976 | Read Full Review of Andrew Jackson (Great Generals)

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The author eloquently distills Jackson’s life and times while stirring in Native American political and military history—but he makes it painfully clear that “to Jackson, killing Indians and driving them further south and west was a necessary function of life in the wilderness.” His was a scourge...

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The Life of Andrew Jackson, 2003, etc.) leans over backward to see the world through his subject’s eyes, but he cannot conceal that Jackson (1767–1845) was perhaps America’s most disagreeable great figure: touchy, belligerent, prejudiced, provincial.

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A slim account of Old Hickory's military career by a leading historian of the period.

Jun 24 2010 | Read Full Review of Andrew Jackson (Great Generals)

Publishers Weekly

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As the alpha wolf of Jackson scholars and a master of historical narrative, Remini (whose three-volume biography, Andrew Jackson, won a National Book Award and was reissued last year) is the perfect writer to recount how Old Hickory, leading a motley crew of fighters, decisively repelled the Brit...

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Publishers Weekly

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"I want to assure the reader that it is not my intention to excuse or exonerate Andrew Jackson for the role he played in the removal of Native Americans west of the Mississippi River.

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HistoryNet

While it is regrettable that he didn't put more effort into fleshing out lower-level combatants (his focus on battle commanders leaves little room to learn about Jackson's Tennessee sharpshooters or the swashbuckling Laffite), Remini certainly makes his case that the Battle of New Orleans helped ...

Aug 11 2001 | Read Full Review of Andrew Jackson (Great Generals)

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