Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World by Gary Indiana

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Synopsis

In the summer of 1962, Andy Warhol unveiled 32 Soup Cans in his first solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles—and sent the art world reeling. The responses ran from incredulity to outrage; the poet Taylor Mead described the exhibition as “a brilliant slap in the face to America.” The exhibition put Warhol on the map—and transformed American culture forever. Almost single-handedly, Warhol collapsed the centuries-old distinction between “high” and “low” culture, and created a new and radically modern aesthetic.

In Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World, the dazzlingly versatile critic Gary Indiana tells the story of the genesis and impact of this iconic work of art. With energy, wit, and tremendous perspicacity, Indiana recovers the exhilaration and controversy of the Pop Art Revolution and the brilliant, tormented, and profoundly narcissistic figure at its vanguard.

 

About Gary Indiana

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This is Gary Indiana’s sixth novel. He is the author of Rent Boy, Resentment, and Let It Bleed, among others. He lives in New York City.
 
Published January 23, 2010 by Basic Books. 194 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Arts & Photography, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World

Kirkus Reviews

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Incisive look at how Warhol’s iconic Soup Cans paintings sparked the Pop Art movement, bringing American artists—Warhol especially—to the forefront of artistic and sociological discourse.

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The Guardian

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Thomson sees the event as part of the nihilistic crime wave that began at the Bates motel, while Indiana, a little more plausibly, notes that the president's death exemplified Warhol's theory of democratised celebrity: "world's most important person killed by world's most insignificant person".

Mar 21 2010 | Read Full Review of Andy Warhol and the Can that ...

Publishers Weekly

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The latest from cultural critic and author Indiana (Utopia's Debris) explores the legacy of Andy Warhol through his most famous and, arguably, groundbreaking work, 1962's Campbell's Soup Cans, a group of 32 20""x16"" paintings of the ubiquitous red-and-white canned staple.

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The Telegraph

Gary Indiana, an American polymath and conjurer of nifty aphorisms, has written a book about Andy Warhol and the 32 paintings – each entitled Campbell’s Soup Can – that comprised his first solo exhibition in 1962.

Apr 19 2010 | Read Full Review of Andy Warhol and the Can that ...

Bookmarks Magazine

Almost single-handedly, Warhol collapsed the centuries-old distinction between “high” and “low” culture, and created a new and radically modern aesthetic.In Andy Warhol and the Can that Sold the World, the dazzlingly versatile critic Gary Indiana tells the story of the genesis and impac...

Mar 08 2010 | Read Full Review of Andy Warhol and the Can that ...

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