Anthony Browne's King Kong by Anthony Browne
From the Story Conceived by Edgar Wallace & Merian C. Cooper

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Synopsis

The classic adventure of the great ape is retold with dramatic full-color illustrations, from an uncharted native island to the populated one of Manhattan, where the climatic confrontation takes place high atop the Empire State Building.
 

About Anthony Browne

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Anthony Browne, a recent British Children's Laureate, has received many awards for his work, including the Hans Christian Andersen Award in 2000 for his services to children's literature. He has written and illustrated more than forty books, including Little Beauty and How Do You Feel? Anthony Browne lives in Kent, England.
 
Published November 1, 1994 by Turner Pub. 92 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Anthony Browne's King Kong

Publishers Weekly

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First, the good news: if ever a couple seemed made for each other artistically, it's the multitalented Browne and King Kong, the celebrated simian star of the 1933 film. In this illustrated retelling,

Oct 31 1994 | Read Full Review of Anthony Browne's King Kong: F...

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Magic and soccer mingle in Wizard, which PW praised for its "wry, splendidly detailed pictures and characteristically assured narrative."

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In a double act of Brown's satirical look at the world of wimps and bullies, the first story showcases Willy the chimp as he takes a body-building course and, in the second, if only by accident, Willy is hailed as a hero.

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""Browne deftly adds a subtle sophistication to this affable tale of a friendship between two dissimilar individuals,"" said PW.

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Gr 2-8-Willy, the irrepressible chimp from Willy el campeon (Willy the Champ) and Willy el timido (Willy the Wimp), both from Fondo de Cultura Economica, is at it again.

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In the succeeding page, Browne cleverly frames a shift in Charles's mood with an illustration divided by a lamppost: threatening clouds and bare trees give way to blue skies and blossoming branches when a smiling, pigtailed (anything but rough-looking) Smudge on the sunny side of the park bench i...

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Observant readers will pick up on several recurring motifs, as well as elements from additional paintings: the desolate streetscape in Edward Hopper's Early Sunday Morning is brightened by flowers in a window (a diminutive reproduction of Vincent van Gogh's Still Life: Vase with Twelve Sunflowers...

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``On Thursday morning at a quarter past ten, Joseph Kaye noticed something strange about the kettle,'' reads the intriguing first line of this imaginative picture book.

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Dad, as his surname suggests, is rather young for his age, a trait Browne demonstrates with crisp text (``He liked very loud rock music'') and precise, even crisper art (Dad, clad in black jeans, black leather jacket and a black T-shirt emblazoned with a pink teddy bear, belts out a tune on his p...

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And from the moment they view Browne's fetching cover illustration, kids will keep their eyes peeled for the inventively placed bananas in Willy's dream scenes.

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A father tells his son that "things [are] going to change," as the boy watches the teakettle turn into a striped cat, the spout of the sink become a nose, and a soccer ball lose its spots and hatch a bird.

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Some of Browne's playful imagery is obvious: the plaid pattern of Dad's bathrobe appears on a piece of toast popping out of the toaster, and he assumes the likeness of a variety of animals as the child announces that ""My dad can eat like a horse,"" ""swim like a fish,"" etc.

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Browne follows the series with a meticulously painted closeup of another primate—himself—and then a group portrait of humans of many ages and ethnicities.

Dec 03 2012 | Read Full Review of Anthony Browne's King Kong: F...

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Anthony Browne's 1989 I Like Books makes an ideal convert to the sturdy series as the monkey star enumerates all the books he enjoys.

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First, the good news: if ever a couple seemed made for each other artistically, it's the multitalented Browne and King Kong, the celebrated simian star of the 1933 film.

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Anthony Browne's Gorilla reappears this fall, nearly 20 years after its original publication.

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