Anton Chekhov by Mikhail Chekhov
A Brother's Memoir

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Synopsis

In a style reminiscent of Anton Chekhov himself--realistic, intimate, and dynamic--Mikhail Chekhov shares unparalleled memories and insights, transporting readers into the world of the Chekhov family. He visits the places where his brother lived and worked and introduces the people he knew and loved, Leo Tolstoy and Piotr Tchaikovsky among them. As a unique eyewitness to the beloved writer's formative years and his artistic maturity, Mikhail Chekhov shows here first-hand the events that inspired the plots for The SeagullThe Black Monk, and The Steppe, among other enduring worksCaptivating, surprising, and a joy to read, this memoir reveals the remarkable life of one the most masterful storytellers of our time.


 

About Mikhail Chekhov

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Mikhail Chekhov (1865-1936) was a writer and novelist in his own right, as well as Anton's assistant and secretary. His role as his brother’s biographer began in 1905 when he was asked to share his recollections in a Moscow magazine. Mikhail died in Yalta in 1936 at the age of 71. Eugene Alper has been a translator for over twenty years and his work includes five major plays by Anton Chekhov (with Professor Carl Mueller), a memoir about Anton Chekhov (by Isaak Altshuller), and movie scripts and interviews for Paramount and Universal.
 
Published December 22, 2009 by Palgrave Macmillan Trade. 257 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Arts & Photography, Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Anton Chekhov

Kirkus Reviews

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There is very little about anyone’s inner life—even Anton’s marriage occurs offstage in several swift sentences—and the author, though he proceeds chronologically, pauses often to append asides on a variety of subjects, including visitors to their house or his own struggles and successes as a wri...

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The New York Times

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In 1989 the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini declared that Salman Rushdie’s novel “The Satanic Verses” was offensive to Islam and issued a fatwa against the author, sentencing him to death.

Sep 17 2012 | Read Full Review of Anton Chekhov: A Brother's Me...

BC Books

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Set at the lakeside country estate of former government employee Sorin (Mark Jenkins), The Seagull finds his famous actress sister Arkadina (Julie Briskman) arriving with her beau, Trigorin (John Bogar), a middlebrow novelist whose great popularity is not accompanied by any sense of personal sati...

Jan 28 2013 | Read Full Review of Anton Chekhov: A Brother's Me...

BC Books

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Not remembering most of the details of the plot of a play like this gives me an extra dimension of perspective: not just how good the players are and how technically adept the production, but how clearly the the director and his cast convey the story to a fresh mind.

Mar 11 2011 | Read Full Review of Anton Chekhov: A Brother's Me...

The New York Review of Books

The ever maturing art and ever more ambitious imaginative reach of Anton Chekhov, one of the world’s greatest masters of the short story, led him in his last years to an increasingly profound exploration of the troubled depths of Russian society and life.

Sep 30 1999 | Read Full Review of Anton Chekhov: A Brother's Me...

Project MUSE

Whyman's focus on plays and productions is particularly timely, as the best English-language books devoted exclusively to Chekhov and released over the past decade have focused either on his life (Rosamund Bartlett's Chekhov: Scenes from a Life, 2004), his life and works viewed through a psychoan...

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