Armageddon in Retrospect by Kurt Vonnegut

68%

12 Critic Reviews

...these writings are benign. They are imbued with the innocence, empathy, and kindness that always seemed central to Vonnegut’s sensibility, and that help to explain his work’s appeal. This volume may be disappointing, but there seems no question that Kurt Vonnegut himself was a nice man.
-Financial Times

Synopsis

The New York Times bestseller-a "gripping" posthumous collection of previously unpublished work by Kurt Vonnegut on the subject of war.

A fitting tribute to a literary legend and a profoundly humane humorist, Armageddon in Retrospect is a collection of twelve previously unpublished writings on war and peace. Imbued with Vonnegut's trademark rueful humor and outraged moral sense, the pieces range from a letter written by Vonnegut to his family in 1945, informing them that he'd been taken prisoner by the Germans, to his last speech, delivered after his death by his son Mark, who provides a warmly personal introduction to the collection. Taken together, these pieces provide fresh insight into Vonnegut's enduring literary genius and reinforce his ongoing moral relevance in today's world.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Kurt Vonnegut

See more books from this Author
Kurt Vonnegut was a master of contemporary American literature. His black humor, satiric voice, and incomparable imagination first captured America's attention in The Sirens of Titan in 1959 and established him as "a true artist" with Cat's Cradle in 1963. He was, as Graham Greene declared, "one of the best living American writers." Mr. Vonnegut passed away in April 2007.
 
Published April 1, 2008 by Berkley. 240 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Armageddon in Retrospect
All: 12 | Positive: 7 | Negative: 5

Kirkus

Below average
on May 20 2010

...an uneven posthumous collection of fiction and nonfiction once again plumbing the madness and soul-destroying inhumanities of war...In places, we hear that unique, vigorous voice; in others, only the sad but certain echo of “nothing gold can stay.”

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Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Jan 09 2017

When Kurt Vonnegut died in April 2007, the world lost a wry commentator on the human condition. Thanks to this collection of unpublished fiction and nonfiction, Vonnegut's voice returns full force.

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Blog Critics

Good
Reviewed by Lisa Damian on Apr 15 2008

I expect that this book would be appreciated by loyal Vonnegut fans as further insight into the work and musings of the author...

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Financial Times

Below average
Reviewed by Lionel Shriver on May 23 2008

...these writings are benign. They are imbued with the innocence, empathy, and kindness that always seemed central to Vonnegut’s sensibility, and that help to explain his work’s appeal. This volume may be disappointing, but there seems no question that Kurt Vonnegut himself was a nice man.

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AV Club

Above average
Reviewed by Zack Handlen on Apr 09 2008

A little context might've helped, but as is, Armageddon strives to be a middle finger to the heavens, and winds up more like a shrug.

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The Bookbag

Below average
Reviewed by Paul Curd on May 01 2008

In his introduction, Mark Vonnegut asks of his father, How could he get away with it? A question he might well redirect towards himself for bringing out a collection that, in this reviewer's humble opinion, should have remained unpublished.

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The Bookbag

Below average
Reviewed by Paul Curd on May 01 2008

The further I read, the weaker the stories became. Maybe it was because I had already got the point right at the start, but the stories seemed to become increasingly predictable and, well, a little embarrassing.

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The Seattle Times

Above average
Reviewed by David Takami on Apr 04 2008

There are a few rough edges that may be inevitable with this assortment of genres...Yet this book offers many moments of clarity and brilliance, sparking in this reader a fondness that went beyond mere nostalgia.

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Review (Barnes & Noble)

Good
Reviewed by Tom Carson on Apr 04 2008

Only his devotees are sure to find this book worthwhile. But if you aren’t a devote...there are honestly only two explanations I can think of. The nice one is that you’re in for a treat, and never mind what the other one is. It’s too rude.

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World War II Database

Good
Reviewed by C. Peter Chen on Feb 06 2012

Understanding of works of literature had always been far from my list of competencies, but I could still tell you that I had enjoyed this book immensely.

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Big Shiny Robot

Good
Reviewed by Dr. Cyborg Robot M.D. attorney at law on Sep 20 2008

This book was released earlier this year, and is a collection of twelve previously unpublished Kurt Vonnegut writings about war and peace. Overall this is a really good book.

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https://bookpage.com

Good
Reviewed by Edward Morris on Apr 01 2008

As in most of his celebrated writings, Vonnegut strikes a fine balance here between the impersonal horrors of war and the mundane coping mechanisms of its victims, between past realities and future possibilities and, ultimately, between good and evil.

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Reader Rating for Armageddon in Retrospect
76%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 76 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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