Bad Behavior by Mary Gaitskill
Stories

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Synopsis

A trade paperback reissue of National Book Award finalist Mary Gaitskill’s debut collection, Bad Behavior—powerful stories about dislocation, longing, and desire which depict a disenchanted and rebellious urban fringe generation that is searching for human connection.

• Now a classic: Bad Behavior made critical waves when it first published, heralding Gaitskill’s arrival on the literary scene and her establishment as one of the sharpest, erotically charged, and audaciously funny writing talents of contemporary literature. Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times called it “Pinteresque,” saying, “Ms. Gaitskill writes with such authority, such radar-perfect detail, that she is able to make even the most extreme situations seem real… her reportorial candor, uncompromised by sentimentality or voyeuristic charm…underscores the strength of her debut.”
 

About Mary Gaitskill

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Mary Gaitskill’s novel, Veronica, was nominated for a 2005 National Book Award and was one of The New York Times’s 10 Best Books of 2005. She is also the author of the acclaimed novels Because They Wanted To and Two Girls, Fat and Thin. Her stories and essays have appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, Esquire, The Best American Short Stories (1993), and The O. Henry Prize Stories (1998). Her short story “Secretary” was the basis for the film of the same name. She lives in New York.
 
Published March 13, 2012 by Simon & Schuster. 225 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Bad Behavior

Kirkus Reviews

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In ""Connection"" and ""Other Factors,"" characters who've managed to get their messy lives more or less on track look back and try to make sense of wild and damaging experiences in the past, and reach out, trying to forgive and understand old (treacherous) friends.

Jun 02 1988 | Read Full Review of Bad Behavior: Stories

Publishers Weekly

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Her observations of the details are acute: A radio emits ``horribly optimistic fiddle music.'' On a New York street a character eyes ``with disaffection and contempt the neatly hatted and booted, dyed and moisturized strangers marching toward her.'' Comparisons to Tama Janowitz are inevitable, bu...

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Slate

When Velvet sees a portrait that Ginger did of her late sister, she says, “Why don’t you do a real picture of her?” Ginger tells Velvet that she doesn’t do “representational or figurative work.” This baffles Velvet.

Nov 03 2015 | Read Full Review of Bad Behavior: Stories

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