Basho and the Fox by Tim J. Myers

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

An old pond.
A frog jumps in.
The sound of water.
—Basho

There are important lessons to be learned, even by proud poets, in this innovative tale of a fox who thinks he’s a great poet and a great poet who thinks he can outdo a fox! It is the 1600s in Japan. Basho is writing the lovely haiku for which he is famous to this day. Given three chances by the fox, he must write a poem that "needn’t be great—only good." Confident of his skill, he’s sure he can win the challenge and its prize, the sweet cherries from the tree near his hut. But not all is what it seems as a newly humble Basho discovers! Delicate watercolors convey a truly Eastern sensibility that takes young readers back in time to feudal Japan while their playful perspectives reinforce the mischievous tone of the text.

 

About Tim J. Myers

See more books from this Author
Myers is a Marshall Cavendish author. Oki S. Han's book, Basho and the Fox, was a New York Times best-seller. Her books, Mr. Long Beard and My Hometown, both won the Korea Children's Book Award. In 2005 Oki was selected as Illustrator of the Year at the Bologna Children's Book Fair for My Hometown. She lives in Korea.
 
Published November 17, 2000 by Cavendish Square Publishing. 32 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Basho and the Fox

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

In this imaginative, tightly woven tale starring Basho (the 17th-century Japanese poet), Myers cleverly places the renowned poet's own words at its heart. When Basho discovers a kimono-clad fox feasti

Oct 30 2000 | Read Full Review of Basho and the Fox

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

In this imaginative, tightly woven tale starring Basho (the 17th-century Japanese poet), Myers cleverly places the renowned poet's own words at its heart.

| Read Full Review of Basho and the Fox

ForeWord Reviews

The fox insists that the cherries belong to foxes more than humans, since it is the foxes that are the better poets.

Aug 16 2000 | Read Full Review of Basho and the Fox

Reader Rating for Basho and the Fox
85%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 11 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review